Stephen Colbert Pokes Fun at Bitcoin in Monologue ...

05-11 06:03 - 'Reddit Founder Talking Crypto On Stephen Colbert Show' (youtube.com) by /u/dollarbillcollector removed from /r/Bitcoin within 1827-1837min

Reddit Founder Talking Crypto On Stephen Colbert Show
Go1dfish undelete link
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Author: dollarbillcollector
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July 16, 2020 | The Late Show with Stephen Colbert | Episode Discussion Thread

LSSC | July 16, 2020 @ 11:35/10:35c on CBS (CLICK HERE TO CHECK YOUR LOCAL LISTINGS)
Previous Episode Discussion Thread
LINK TO FULL EPISODE
Youtube Videos: We Must Stop Dogs From Voting In The 2020 Election Double Hack: Bitcoin Bandits Take Over Twitter While Russia Spies On Covid Vaccine Researchers Want To See Your Protest On The News? Use The Car-A-Fire Filter! W. Kamau Bell: America Was Built On White Supremacy. It Won't Go Away Until We Redesign The System The Chicks On Why They Dropped The "Dixie" And Wrote A Modern Protest Anthem, "March March" The Chicks "March March" - Late Show #PlayAtHome
Stephen Colbert from home
Guest:
Comedian W. Kamau Bell
Interview with, and musical performance by:
The Chicks
submitted by Raradra to LateShow [link] [comments]

Crypto Month in Review - March 2018

Previous reviews: Jan, Feb Crypto moves way too fast for me to keep up, so I aggregate each day's biggest headline and publish the list at the end of the month. Below is my list for March. My main news source was reddit. My main holdings are ETH and NANO, but I try to make these lists as unbiased as possible. As requested by you guys, I have included source links to each of these headlines. I also took a screenshot of the market cap movement throughout the month that you can see here. To speak to March in particular - even though we are in a bear market right now, and the first half of the month had pretty negative headlines, hopefully the many promising headlines in the 2nd half of the list will help assure you that distributed ledger technology is only becoming more adopted and embedded in society with each passing day. 3/1 - Oyster Pearl completes a coin burn of 10% of its total supply. This comes one day after they released their testnet. 3/2 - TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington is subpoenaed by the Securites and Exchange Commision over his $100 million cryptocurrency fund. 3/3 - A class-action lawsuit is filed against Coinbase alleging insider trading prior to Bitcoin Cash trading going live on their exchange. 3/4 - An anonymous person publishes a pastebin document detailing a FUD campaign by CoinDesk backers Digital Currency Group against IOTA. 3/5 - Coinbase hires former LinkedIn exec Emilie Choi to serve as VP of corporate & business development, with an emphasis on “world-class acquisition and partnership opportunities”. 3/6 - WaltonChain subsidiary ZhongChuan IoT and Alibaba Cloud sign a strategic partnership to research Smart City solutions and blockchain application schemes. 3/7 - A rogue actor who had been phishing Binance accounts uses the victims’ funds to pump the price of Viacoin. Withdrawals on Binance were automatically frozen, and the hacker’s transactions were later rolled back. 3/8 - Sierra Leone, in conjunction with blockchain voting startup Agora, records the world’s first ever presidential election on a blockchain. (NOTE: This claim has now been rejected by the Sierra Leone government.) 3/9 - Security researchers at the University of Toronto catch the Egyptian government remotely hijacking citizens’ computers to covertly mine Monero. 3/10 - Reports reveal that Google has been quietly purging cryptocurrency ads, mainly those for ICOs, under pressure from the FBI. The FBI also convinced Facebook to do the same thing in February. 3/11 - Binance posts a $250,000 bounty for information that leads to the arrest of the perpetrators of the March 7th hack. 3/12 - John Oliver explains Bitcoin and blockchain to a global audience and pens his #CraefulGang movement while condemning projects such as EOS and Bitconnect on his CNN show Last Week Tonight. 3/13 - VeChain announces a partnership with Chinese supply chain risk management company LogSafer. 3/14 - In the wake of John Oliver’s cryptocurrency segment in which EOS spokesperson Brock Pierce’s questionable past was outlined, EOS decides to cut ties with him, scrubbing their site and YouTube channel of any reference to him. 3/15 - Bitcoin core devs release a beta version of the Lightning network to the mainnet. 3/16 - The 2018 Joint Economic Committee Report dedicates an entire section to the rise of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology. 3/17 - Bitmain announces a new mining machine, the antminer 3x, that is primarily designed to mine Monero. The Monero community claims that they will render the miner useless with an upcoming fork. 3/18 - At the G20 summit, the Financial Security board opines that crypto-assets do not pose a risk to global financial stability, and that further regulations at this time would not be necessary. 3/19 - Businessman and Shark Tank investor Kevin O’Leary announces his plan to work with the SEC to issue a cryptocurrency that will act as stock for a $400 million dollar hotel company. He also states that asset-based coins will eventually replace small-cap stocks. 3/20 - Nano releases their developer road map, revealing that they have a point of sale payment system in alpha stages of testing. 3/21 - A DDoS attack against the Bitcoin Lightning Network brings 20% of its nodes down. 3/22 - Yahoo Japan announces that it is acquiring Japanese exchange BitARG and will launch its own exchange in 2019. 3/23 - After uncertain talks with Hong Kong regulators, Binance announces that it is moving to Malta. It also reveals plans to allow users to buy crypto with fiat directly. 3/24 - Santander announces plans to launch an international money transfer app that will run on Ripple. 3/25 - The Coinbase logo is spotted in the new intro to HBO show Silicon Valley. 3/26 - Coinbase announces incoming support for ERC20 tokens without specifying which tokens it will list. 3/27 - Stephen Colbert announces on his show that Ripple has donated $26 million in XRP to DonorsChoose.org . 3/28 - Decentralized payment network OmiseGo and Ethereum cofounder Vitalik Buterin donate $1 million via GiveDirectly to support Ugandan refugees. 3/29 - Cryptocurrency exchange and Tether backer Bitfinex announces imminent fiat markets for BTC, ETH, NEO, IOTA, and EOS. They will fully support British Pounds and Japanese Yen, and offer partial support for the Euro. 3/30 - P2P payment platform Request Network goes live on the Ethereum mainnet. 3/31 - WaltonChain announces the launch of its mainnet, featuring a wallet with “1-click” mining.
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May 2, 2016 | The Late Show with Stephen Colbert | Episode Discussion Thread (S02E071 - #133)

LSSC (S02E071 - #133) | May 2, 2016 @ 11:35/10:35c on CBS (CLICK HERE TO CHECK YOUR LOCAL LISTINGS)
Previous Episode Discussion Thread
LINK TO FULL EPISODE
Youtube Videos: Liz Gets A Meeting, Sort Of (Part 2) May 2nd: Larry Wilmore, Bitcoin and Ringling Elephants To Know Ted Cruz Is To Wish You Didn't Donald Trump Puts ISIS On Non-Specific Notice Bill O'Reilly Enters The No Chill Zone Morris Chestnut Holds Fake Organs All Day Deerhunter Performs 'Living My Life'
Guests:
Host of "The O'Reilly Factor" Bill O'Reilly Actor Morris Chestnut
Musical performance by
Deerhunter
submitted by Raradra to LateShow [link] [comments]

Large self-posts hang when opening

Hey everyone. This is the second time I've ran into this bug and decided to share. On extremely large self-posts the app hangs for a second before it opens to the post -- whether you tap or 3D Touch it.
On 2.8 beta, iOS 10.1.1, iPhone 6s+
Also, as I'm making this post another bug popped up. When a post (and maybe a comment too?) contains an extremely large amount of text, the input window eventually slows to a crawl making it impossible to continue writing.
Copy pasted the Reddit Wikipedia page to make this post a living example.
In June 2005,[72] Reddit was founded in Medford, Massachusetts by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian, both 22-year-old graduates of the University of Virginia.[73] The team expanded to include Christopher Slowe in November 2005. Between November 2005 and January 2006 Reddit merged with Aaron Swartz's company Infogami, and Swartz became an equal owner of the resulting parent company, Not A Bug.[74][75] Condé Nast Publications, owner of Wired, acquired Reddit on October 31, 2006, and the team moved to San Francisco.[76] In January 2007, Swartz was fired.[77]
By the end of 2008, the team had grown to include Erik Martin, Jeremy Edberg,[78] David King,[79] and Mike Schiraldi.[80] In 2009, Huffman and Ohanian moved on to form Hipmunk, recruiting Slowe[81] and King[82] shortly thereafter. In May 2010, Reddit was named in Lead411's "2010 Hottest San Francisco Companies" list.[83] In July 2010, after explosive traffic growth, Reddit introduced Reddit Gold, offering new features for a price of $3.99/month or $29.99/year.[84] Reddit Gold adds a number of features to the interface, including the ability to display more comments on a page, access to the private "lounge" subreddit, and notifications whenever one's username is mentioned in a comment. It's also possible to endow comments or submissions of other users and thereby give a gold membership to them as an anonymous present.[85]
On September 6, 2011, Reddit became operationally independent of Condé Nast, now operating as a separate subsidiary of its parent company, Advance Publications.[86] On January 11, 2012, Reddit announced that it would be participating in a 12-hour sitewide blackout in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act.[87] The blackout occurred on January 18 and coincided with the blackouts of Wikipedia and several other websites. In May 2012, Reddit joined the Internet Defense League, a group formed to organize future protests.[88] On February 14, 2013, Reddit began accepting the digital currency bitcoin for its Reddit Gold subscription service through a partnership with bitcoin payment processor Coinbase.[89]
In October 2014, Reddit announced Redditmade, a service which allowed moderators to create merchandise for their subreddits. Redditmade closed in February 2015.[90] In November 2014, Chief Executive Yishan Wong resigned and co-founder Ohanian returned as the full-time executive chairman. Ellen Pao, Reddit's business and partnerships strategist became the interim chief executive.[91] On July 10, 2015, Pao resigned and was replaced by Steve Huffman as CEO.[92][93]
In October 2015, Reddit announced a news portal called Upvoted, designed to broaden the reach of Reddit as a standalone site featuring editorial content from Reddit users.[94] In April 2016, Reddit launched a new blocking tool in an attempt to curb online harassment. The tool allows a user to hide posts and comments from selected redditors in addition to blocking private messages from those redditors.[95] The option to block a redditor is done by clicking a button in the inbox.
Technology
Reddit was originally written in Common Lisp but was rewritten in Python in December 2005.[4] The reasons given for the switch were wider access to code libraries and greater development flexibility. The Python web framework that former Reddit employee Swartz developed to run the site, web.py, is now available as an open-source project.[96] On June 18, 2008, Reddit became an open source project.[97] With the exception of the anti-spam/cheating portions, all of the code and libraries written for Reddit became freely available on GitHub.[98] As of November 10, 2009, Reddit uses Pylons as its web framework.[99]
As of November 10, 2009, Reddit has decommissioned their physical servers and migrated to Amazon Web Services.[100] Reddit uses PostgreSQL as their primary datastore and is slowly moving to Apache Cassandra, a column-oriented datastore. It uses RabbitMQ for offline processing, HAProxy for load balancing and memcached for caching. In early 2009, Reddit started using jQuery.[101] On June 7, 2010, Reddit staff launched a revamped mobile interface featuring rewritten CSS, a new color scheme, and a multitude of improvements.[102]
On July 21, 2010, Reddit outsourced the Reddit search engine to Flaptor, who used its search product IndexTank.[103] As of July 12, 2012, Reddit uses Amazon CloudSearch.[104] There are several unofficial applications that use the Reddit API in the Google Play store, and F-Droid repository. Examples include: Reddit is Fun,[105] Andreddit,[106] F5, BaconReader,[107] Reddit Sync[108] and an Android tablet specific application called Reddita.[109] There are also several Windows apps used to access Reddit, including unofficial Reddit apps such as ReddHub[110] and Reddit To Go!.[111] An unofficial desktop application Reditr[112] exists that is compatible with Windows, OS X, Linux and ChromeOS.
There are several Reddit applications for iOS. These include Karma, Upvote, iReddit, iPad-specific applications such as Reddzine and Biscuit, and, until April 2016, Alien Blue.[113] In September 2014, an official mobile application for browsing AMA (Ask Me Anything) threads was released for the iOS and Android platforms under the name Ask me Anything.[114] In October 2014, Alien Blue was acquired by Reddit and became the official iOS Reddit app.[115] In April 2016, Reddit released an official application called Reddit: The Official App, which is available on Google Play and the iOS App Store, and Alien Blue was removed from the App Store in favor of the new app.[116]
The website is known for its open nature and diverse user community that generate its content.[119] Its demographics allows for wide-ranging subject areas, or main subreddits, that receive much attention, as well as the ability for smaller subreddits to serve more niche purposes. For example, the University of Reddit, a subreddit that exists to communally teach, emerged from the ability to enter and leave the online forum, the "classroom", at will, and classes ranging from computer science to music, to fine art theory exist.[120] The unique possibilities that subreddits provide create new opportunities for raising attention and fostering discussion across many areas. In gaining popularity in terms of unique users per day, Reddit has been a platform for many to raise publicity for a number of causes. And with that increased ability to garner attention and a large audience, users can use one of the largest communities on the Internet for new, revolutionary, and influential purposes.[121]
Its popularity has enabled users to take unprecedented advantage of such a large community. Its innovative socially ranked rating and sorting system drives a method that is useful for fulfilling certain goals of viewership or simply finding answers to interesting questions. User sentiments about the website's function and structure include feelings about the breadth and depth of the discussions on Reddit and how the site makes it easy to discover new and interesting items. Almost all of the user reviews on Alexa.com, which rates Reddit's monthly unique traffic rating 125th in the United States, mention Reddit's "good content" as a likable quality. However, others raise the negative aspects of the potential for Reddit's communities to possess a "hive mind" of sorts,[122] embodying some negative aspects of group interaction theories like crowd psychology and collective consciousness.
Philanthropic efforts Reddit has been known as the instigator of several charity projects, some short and others long-term, in order to benefit others. A selection of major events are outlined below:
In early October 2010, a story was posted on Reddit about a seven-year-old girl, Kathleen Edward, who was in the advanced stages of Huntington's disease. The girl's neighbors were taunting her and her family. Redditors banded together and gave the girl a shopping spree[123][124] at Tree Town Toys, a toy store local to the story owned by a Reddit user. In early December 2010, members of the Christianity subreddit decided to hold a fundraiser[125] and later members of the atheism subreddit decided to give some friendly competition,[126] cross-promoting[127] fundraising drives for Doctors Without Borders and World Vision's Clean Water Fund, respectively. Later, the Islam subreddit joined in, raising money for Islamic Relief. In less than a week, the three communities (as well as the Reddit community at large) raised over $50,000.[128] Most of this was raised by the atheism subreddit, though the smaller Christianity subreddit had a higher average donation amount per subscriber.[129] A similar donation drive in 2011 saw the atheism subreddit raise over $200,000 for charity.[130] Reddit started the largest Secret Santa program in the world, which is still in operation to date. For the 2010 Holiday season, 92 countries were involved in the Secret Santa program. There were 17,543 participants, and $662,907.60 was collectively spent on gift purchases and shipping costs.[131][132][133] In 2014, about 200,000 users from 188 countries participated.[134] Several Celebrities have participated in the program, including Bill Gates[135] and Snoop Dogg.[136] Eventually, the Secret Santa program expanded to various other occasions through Redditgifts. Members from Reddit donated over $600,000 to DonorsChoose in support of Stephen Colbert's March to Keep Fear Alive. The donation spree broke previous records for the most money donated to a single cause by the Reddit community and resulted in an interview with Colbert on Reddit.[137] Reddit users donated $185,356 to Direct Relief for Haiti after an earthquake devastated the nation in January 2010.[138] Reddit users donated over $70,000 to the Faraja Orphanage in the first 24 hours to help secure the orphanage after intruders robbed and attacked one of the volunteers, who survived a strike to the head from a machete.[139] In October 2012, "Shitty Watercolour", a popular Redditor known for posting watercolor paintings on the website,[140][141][142] streamed live a 12-hour painting session on YouTube to raise money for charity: water, a non-profit organization which aims to provide potable drinking water in developing countries. Redditors donated a minimum of $10 to have a photo of their choice painted in a 5 by 5 centimetres (2.0 by 2.0 in) square section of large sheets of paper.[143][144] The paint-a-thon raised $2,700.[145] In February 2014, Reddit announced it would be donating 10% of its annual ad revenue to non-profits voted upon by its users.[146] Reddit continued this policy for 2015, donating $82,765 each to Electronic Frontier Foundation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Doctors Without Borders, Erowid Center, Wikimedia Foundation, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, NPR, Free Software Foundation, Freedom From Religion Foundation, and Tor Project.[147] In response to the 2015 Nepal Earthquake, redditors raised more than $145,000 for Direct Relief and more than $110,000 for MAP International.[148] Commercial activity In February 2013, Betabeat published a post that recognized the influx of multi-national corporations like Costco, Taco Bell, Subaru, and McDonald's posting branded content on Reddit that was made to appear as if it was original content from legitimate Reddit users.[149] Reddit's former Director of Communications noted that while a large number of Chief Marketing Officers want to "infiltrate the reddit community on behalf of their brand," she emphasized that "self-promotion is frowned upon" and the site is "100 percent organic."[150][151][152][153] She recommended that advertisers design promotions that "spark conversations and feedback."[154] She recommended that businesses use AMAs to get attention for public figures but cautioned "It is important to approach AMAs carefully and be aware that this may not be a fit for every project or client."[155] Nissan ran a successful Branded content promotion offering users free gifts to publicize a new car,[156][157] though the company was later ridiculed for suspected astroturfing when the CEO only answered puff piece questions on the site.[158][159] Taylor described these situations as "high risk" noting "We try hard to educate people that they have to treat questions that may seem irreverent or out of left field the same as they would questions about the specific project they are promoting."[160]
Reddit's users are more privacy-conscious than on other websites, using tools like AdBlock and proxies,[161] and they hate "feeling manipulated by brands" but respond well to "content that begs for intelligent viewers and participants."[162] Lauren Orsini writes in ReadWrite that "Reddit's huge community is the perfect hype machine for promoting a new movie, a product release, or a lagging political campaign" but "very specific set of etiquette. Redditors don't want to advertise for you, they want to talk to you."[163] Journalists have used the site as a basis for stories, though they are advised by the site's policies to respect that "reddit's communities belong to their members" and to seek proper attribution for people's contributions.[164]
Reddit announced that they would begin using VigLink to redirect affiliate links in June 2016[165]
Reddit effect Main article: Slashdot effect Also known as the "Slashdot effect", the Reddit effect occurs when a smaller website has a high influx of traffic after being linked to on Reddit.[166] It is also called the "Reddit Hug of Death" among the website's users. Because Reddit is such a large site, the traffic is immense and can easily crash smaller sites. In order for users to see crashed websites, several Reddit bots have been created that take a snapshot of the website before large amounts of traffic flood the affected website.
"Restoring Truthiness" campaign As a response to Glenn Beck's August 28, 2010, Restoring Honor rally (heavily promoted by him in his Fox News broadcasts during the summer), in September 2010 Reddit users started a movement to persuade Stephen Colbert to have a counter-rally in Washington, D.C.[167] The movement, which came to be called "Restoring Truthiness", was started by user mrsammercer, in a post where he described waking up from a dream in which Stephen Colbert was holding a satirical rally in D.C.[168] He writes, "This would be the high water mark of American satire. Half a million people pretending to suspend all rational thought in unison. Perfect harmony. It'll feel like San Francisco in the late 60s, only we won't be able to get any acid."
The idea resonated with the Reddit community, which launched a campaign to bring the event to life. Over $600,000[169] was raised for charity to gain the attention of Colbert. The campaign was mentioned on-air several times, and when the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear was held in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 2010, thousands of redditors made the journey.[170]
During a post-rally press conference, Reddit co-founder Ohanian asked, "What role did the Internet campaign play in convincing you to hold this rally?" Jon Stewart responded by saying that, though it was a very nice gesture, the two had already thought of the idea prior and the deposit on using the National Mall was already paid during the summer, so it acted mostly as a "validation of what we were thinking about attempting".[171] In a message to the Reddit community, Colbert later added, "I have no doubt that your efforts to organize and the joy you clearly brought to your part of the story contributed greatly to the turnout and success."[172]
The website generally lets moderators on individual subreddits make editorial decisions about what content to allow, and has a history of permitting some subreddits dedicated to controversial content.[173] Many of the default pages are highly moderated, with the "science" subreddit banning climate change denialism,[174] and the "news" subreddit banning opinion pieces and columns.[175] Reddit has changed its site-wide editorial policies several times, sometimes in reaction to controversies.[176][177][178][179] Reddit has had a history of giving a platform to objectionable but legal content, and in 2011, news media covered the way that jailbait was being shared on the site before the site changed their policies to explicitly ban "suggestive or sexual content featuring minors".[180] Following some controversial incidents of Internet vigilantism, Reddit introduced a strict rule against the publication of non-public personally-identifying information via the site (colloquially known as doxxing). Those who break the rule are subject to a site-wide ban, and their posts and even entire communities may be removed for breaking the rule.
2010 On December 16, 2010, a redditor named Matt posted a link describing how he has donated a kidney, and included a JustGive link to encourage users to give donations to the American Cancer Society.[181] After an initially positive reaction, Reddit users began to become suspicious of Matt's intentions, and suggested that he was keeping the donations for himself. Users telephoned his home and he received death threats. Matt eventually proved that he was genuine by uploading his doctor's records.[182]
2011 On October 18, 2011, an IT manager submitted a post to the subreddit "gameswap" offering Redditors to trade one of 312 codes he had been given for the game Deus Ex: Human Revolution.[183] A group of users obtained his personal details, and began to blackmail him for the codes.[184] The Monday after uploading the post, he received 138 threatening phone calls both at home and at his job, and by the end of the day he had been fired.[185]
2013 Following the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, Reddit faced criticism after users wrongly identified a number of people as suspects.[186] Notable among misidentified bombing suspects was Sunil Tripathi, a student reported missing before the bombings took place. A body reported to be Sunil's was found in Providence River in Rhode Island on April 25, 2013, according to Rhode Island Health Department. The cause of death was not immediately known, but authorities said they did not suspect foul play.[187] The family later confirmed Tripathi's death was a result of suicide.[188] Reddit general manager Martin later issued an apology for this behavior, criticizing the "online witch hunts and dangerous speculation" that took place on the website.[189] The incident was later referenced in the season 5 episode of the CBS TV series The Good Wife titled "Whack-a-Mole,"[190] as well as The Newsroom.[191][192]
In late October 2013, the moderators of the "politics" subreddit banned a large group of websites. Many were left wing opinion websites, such as Mother Jones, The Huffington Post, Salon, Alternet, Rawstory, The Daily Kos, Truthout, Media Matters, and ThinkProgress as well as some popular progressive blog sites, such as Democratic Underground and Crooks and Liars. They also banned a number of right wing sites—Drudge Report, Breitbart, The Daily Caller, Dailypaul, Power Line, and Reason. Salon reported that "the section's moderators explained in a post on Tuesday, the goal is 'to reduce the number of blogspam submissions and sensationalist titles.' The purge, the moderators explained, is also aimed at sites that provide lots of "bad journalism."[193] The December 2013 list of banned websites has been modified since late October, and sites with original content, such as Mother Jones and The Huffington Post, are allowed.[194] Moderators also banned RT, which moderators stated was due to vote manipulation and spam, though one moderator stated that he wanted RT banned because it is Kremlin backed.[195][196]
2014 In August 2014, photos from the 2014 celebrity photo hack were widely disseminated across the site.[197][198] A dedicated subreddit, "TheFappening," was created for this purpose,[199] and contained links to most if not all of the criminally obtained explicit images.[200][201][202][203][204] Some images of Liz Lee and McKayla Maroney from the leak were identified by redditors and outside commentators as child pornography because the photos were taken when the women were underage.[205] The subreddit was banned on September 6.[206] The scandal led to wider criticisms concerning the website's administration from The Verge and The Daily Dot.[207][208]
Also in August 2014, moderators and administrators censored a sizeable amount of content related to the GamerGate controversy; one thread in the "gaming" subreddit had almost 24,000 comments removed.[209] Multiple subreddits were deleted by administrators for voicing opinions on Zoe Quinn, Anita Sarkeesian, Brianna Wu and similarly important GamerGate controversy figures.[210] The subreddit "ZoeQuinnDiscussion" was banned for violating the Reddit rules.[211] Administrators defended this response when questioned, blaming 4chan for raiding threads and causing harm. This was debated by some redditors.[212] An anonymous subreddit moderator claims he was removed for leaking correspondence between himself and Zoe Quinn.[213] On December 18, 2014, Reddit took the unusual step of banning a subreddit, "SonyGOP," that was being used to distribute hacked Sony files.[214]
2015 After Ellen Pao became CEO, she was initially a target of criticism by users who objected to her lawsuit.[215] Later on June 10, 2015, Reddit shut down the 150,000-subscriber "fatpeoplehate" subreddit and four others citing issues related to harassment.[216] This move was seen as very controversial; some commenters said that the bans went too far, while others said that the bans did not go far enough.[217] One of the latter complaints concerned a subreddit that was "expressing support" for the perpetrator of the Charleston church shooting.[218] Responding to the accusations of "skewed enforcement", Reddit reaffirmed their commitment to free expression and stated that "There are some subreddits with very little viewership that get highlighted repeatedly for their content, but those are a tiny fraction of the content on the site."
On July 2, 2015, Reddit began experiencing a series of blackouts as moderators set popular subreddit communities to private, in an event dubbed "AMAgeddon," a portmanteau of AMA ("ask me anything") and Armageddon. This was done in protest of the recent firing of Victoria Taylor, an administrator who helped organize citizen-led interviews with famous people on the popular "Ask me Anything" subreddit. Organizers of the blackout also expressed resentment about the recent severance of the communication between Reddit and the moderators of subreddits.[219] The blackout intensified on July 3 when former community manager David Croach gave an AMA about being fired. Before deleting his posts, he stated that Ellen Pao dismissed him with one year of health coverage when he had cancer and did not recover quickly enough.[220][221] Following this, a Change.org petition to remove Pao as CEO of Reddit Inc. reached over 200,000 signatures.[222][223][224] Pao posted a response on July 3 as well as an extended version of it on July 6 in which she apologized for bad communication and not delivering on promises. She also apologized on behalf of the other administrators and noted that problems already existed over the past several years.[225][226][227][228] On July 10, Pao resigned as CEO and was replaced by former CEO and co-founder Steve Huffman.[92][229]
submitted by izmar to getnarwhal [link] [comments]

Ads for 2017-05-02 (1 / 2)

Subreddit Title Brand
AskReddit What would be shown on a NSFW Mr. Rogers neighborhood show for adults? Rogers
mildlyinteresting Made these bricks from Lego molds that we filled we Jello. Lego
pics Effects of Agent Orange on children in Vietnam Orange
news Active shooter incident at Colgate University right now. Not in the media yet. Fingers crossed it turns out okay. Link is to Colgate's website. Colgate
gaming Craziest Modded Xbox I've Ever Seen Xbox
gaming Outlast 2 with Philips Hue lights xpost from /outlast Philips
AskReddit What is your favorite place to visit in the continental United States? United
news Active shooter on Colgate University campus in Hamilton, NY Colgate
videos My friend started a new Youtube channel to help get people into crypto currencies. He's great for answering any questions you've been afraid to ask about about Bitcoin or Etherium! Youtube
Music Whatever happened to the talented Hip Hop artist Chief Keef? His rhymes were legend and it was an honor to bump his raps in my Ford Escort. Ford
todayilearned TIL in 2001, the United States' military airdropped 2.4 million Pop-Tarts in Afghanistan during the US invasion. United
pics Going through my emails today and decided to delete all 12k +the few I've read undead emails, and because Yahoo is stupid I have to scroll all th3 way to the bottom. Look what I found. Yahoo
news Police Respond to Reports of 'Armed Person' at Colgate University Colgate
television The fall of ESPN has begun… and it’s only going to accelerate ESPN
WritingPrompts WP in the near future, various chains and companies let their mascots get snarky with each other on Twitter, firing various insults and burns back and forth. Until one day, a mascot Twitter takes things a little too far. Twitter
Showerthoughts The last cell carrier to offer Paul Marcarelli, the "Can you hear me now?" actor from Verizon now at Sprint, more money will win. He's left all the other carriers and the last one will look the best in comparison. Verizon
pics When the jerks at Whole Foods cram everything into one bag because they are in a hurry Whole Foods
gaming I bought every Mario toy they had at McDonald's over the weekend McDonald's
gaming I bought every Mario toy they had at McDonald's over the weekend McDonald's
mildlyinteresting top right Google Chrome on Mobile displays a :D when you reach 100 open tabs Google
funny Parody of "Coming Out" Youtube Videos Youtube
videos What happens when you combine 2 Google Home bots desperately trying to conversate between each other and Twitch chat Google
news Portland May Day Protesters Hurl Cans of Pepsi at Cops Pepsi
pics My suicidal nephew posted this on his Facebook today, he is now surrounded by loving family. Facebook
AskReddit You rub a Diet Pepsi bottle and a genie wearing a polyester suit emerges. This is the Mediocre Genie, who can make instantly you proficient in a below average way in the skill of your choosing. What is your wish? Pepsi
Jokes Just got an email from Google explaining how to read maps backward... Google
worldnews Venezuela's President Maduro calls for new constituent body - BBC News BBC
worldnews Report: Facebook helped advertisers target teens who feel “worthless” Facebook
movies Jack Black in Orange County will always be a favorite of mine! Orange
personalfinance Discover and Chase are suddenly offering free credit checks in their apps that dont hurt your credit score. is this legit? Chase
Jokes What the pirate said when he left the Honda dealer... Honda
nottheonion Australian detained in United States for 'overstaying visa by 90 minutes' United
pics In the back of a taptap pickup truck in Port au Prince Haiti, feat. Mom au
personalfinance Can you get Chase Sapphire Preferred annual $95 fee waived? Chase
Showerthoughts Someday, we will all be saying "Back in my day, we had to Google things we wanted to learn" Google
WritingPrompts WP "We are an Army of Stars unleashed.The Sky takes notes when we speak. Our capes move with the Wind.Because of the Wings beneath. This is Royalty" Sky
nosleep This guy from my school went missing after shooting a video for his Youtube channel on illegal grounds. Youtube
news [Seattle May Day demonstrators pass ‘peace joint,’ share Pepsi The Seattle Times](https://www.reddit.com/news/comments/68r2q7/seattle_may_day_demonstrators_pass_peace_joint/)
Showerthoughts "The Sky is the Limit" is a pretty poor thing to say to someone aspiring to be an astronaut. Sky
Showerthoughts All I need is a driver's license to rent a box truck U-Haul, but I need to be 25 to rent a Honda Civic Honda
AskReddit Your last Google search is your super power, while your second to last unrelated search is your weakness. What are you master of? Google
space Neil DeGrasse Tyson on Colbert Tyson
TwoXChromosomes How Intel Eliminated Its Own Gender Pay Gap Intel
AskReddit What happens if you steal an iMac from the Apple Store? Apple
videos Introducing The Frork™: McDonald's Latest Invention ft. Anthony Sullivan McDonald's
pics Guess they REALLY want you to update. People using an older version of the Youtube app are punished with a 30 second wait everytime they go back into it. Youtube
aww My Sadie Bell in a Minnie Mouse outfit Bell
AskReddit Could two smart computer science PhD students create a search engine that unseats Google? How vulnerable is Google to this possibility? Google
todayilearned TIL there are 71 different gender options on UK Facebook 50 in America Facebook
dataisbeautiful Top Movies as Percent of Industry Box Office Total OC Total
gaming Xbox One and Xbox 360 Deals With Gold until May 9 announced: ‘Street Fighter X Tekken’ and ‘DmC: Definitive Edition’ among the best deals Xbox
nottheonion Australian detained in United States for 'overstaying visa by 90 minutes' United
sports Pregame - Chicago Bulls vs Celtics Game 6 @ the United Center United
worldnews North Korea says it is 'ready for war' with Donald Trump's United States United
worldnews Indian IT services firm Infosys plans to hire 10,000 American workers, open 4 U.S. tech centres Infosys
AskReddit What's the most WTF thing you've ever heard or read about the United States or its culture? United
worldnews Google, Amazon And eBay Discontinue Support For Apple Watch Apple
worldnews Google, Amazon And eBay Discontinue Support For Apple Watch eBay
worldnews India-based IT services firm Infosys said it plans to hire 10,000 U.S. workers in the next two years and open four technology centers in the United States after Trump targets outsourcing firms Infosys
worldnews India-based IT services firm Infosys said it plans to hire 10,000 U.S. workers in the next two years and open four technology centers in the United States after Trump targets outsourcing firms United
Music [Mayors bet music, BBQ sauce over Blues-Predators semifinal FOX Sports](https://www.reddit.com/Music/comments/68rs4y/mayors_bet_music_bbq_sauce_over_bluespredators/)
AskReddit How does Apple take stunning photos for its iPhone advertisements? Apple
nottheonion Protesters throw Pepsi cans at police during May Day demonstrations Pepsi
gifs 1950's Ford dump truck doing a wheelie Ford
nottheonion Sierra vista woman finds note from Chinese prisoner in Walmart purse Walmart
AskReddit What will happen if Google starts charging for every search? Google
AskReddit Designers of Reddit logo, why the orange tint to the red. Are we hint hint hinting for a love of Orange people? Orange
AskReddit if Kraft Punk is the cheese-off of Daft Punk, what would be the cheese-off of other famous bands? Kraft
worldnews UK should not back US Middle-East policy, say peers - BBC News BBC
funny Found this guy on Google street view Google
funny Australian Uber driver accidentally picks up a sex worker instead of his real lift! The resulting conversation is hilarious! Uber
mildlyinteresting The McDonald's app looks like an tear-off calendar. McDonald's
television Neil deGrasse Tyson Imparts Sexy Cosmic Knowledge The Late Show with Stephen Colbert Tyson
Showerthoughts We would have figured out the concept of gravity way earlier if Adam had applied his brain instead of instinctively eating that Apple ! Apple
mildlyinteresting Today I noticed that Google Calendar's favicon has the day of the month Google
Music Fiona Apple - Shadowboxer Piano Pop Apple
dataisbeautiful Cultural value orientation scores for 80 countries based on research by Shalom H Schwartz using Google Sheets OC Google
pics This Volkswagen has a integrated Beer opener. Volkswagen
AskReddit Can anybody tell me if adidas are going to release black adidas manias in their new champagne pack? and if so, when will they be released? adidas
sports Why is ESPN laying off so many people? ESPN
videos ELLIE GOULDING - First Land Rover Velar driver in New York City. Land Rover
AskReddit What are some of the most mysterious/creepy things you've seen on Google Earth? Google
LifeProTips LPT: Mother's Day in the United States is 12 days away. United
movies Johnny Depp is fed lines through earpiece, ex-managers claim - BBC News BBC
AskReddit Has anyone actually won something from those Facebook "Share, Like & Win" Posts, what did you win? Facebook
photoshopbattles PsBattle: This awesome 40 dollar foot tattoo sold on a Facebook yard sale site.. Facebook
pics This is where Walmart wants their carts Walmart
AskReddit Why are the Ocean and Sky blue? Sky
AskReddit Apple, Google or Microsoft - who will fail first ? Google
AskReddit Apple, Google or Microsoft - who will fail first ? Microsoft
mildlyinteresting My school used an old Apple iPhone to remind students about no electronic devices during testing Apple
sports 18 year-old Mike Tyson with Cus D'Amato before Tyson's first professional fight against Hector Mercedes on March 6, 1985 in Albay, NY. Tyson
worldnews Hackers Alert: Orange Is The New Black S05 Leaked Online Orange
explainlikeimfive ELI5:Why do mobile games want me to log into Facebook and Twitter? What do they gain? Facebook
mildlyinteresting This Volkswagen Golf has an integrated Beer opener. Volkswagen
personalfinance Just leased a CPO '15 Lexus GS350 two months ago for 3 years.. I hate it. Keep or roll into a new financed car I want? Lexus
gaming Shadowrun was one of the best shooters of last gen and it recently became backwards compatible on Xbox One. Check out this video that explains all of the different abilities and weapons. It's an amazing game and probably the best game you have never played Xbox
Showerthoughts Vaping is to cigarettes what Google Glass was to sunglasses. Google
videos A mashup of almost every Walt Disney Animation Studio release Walt Disney
todayilearned TIL there would be no Apple without Walter L. Shaw according to Jobs. Inventions based on his patents include: the speakerphone, call forwarding, conference calling and the answering machine. As well as the black box. Apple
todayilearned TIL that The McAfrika was a burger sold by McDonald's in Norway and "traded" as a Limited Edition Olympic Games Burger. It attracted significant public criticism as a result of its name and the timing of its launch. McDonald's
AskReddit If we saw your recent Google search history what would we think about you? Google
worldnews France election: Watch Le Pen and Fillon read the same passage - BBC News BBC
worldnews Merkel presses Putin on gay rights - BBC News BBC
Futurology Chinese internet giant Tencent opens artificial intelligence lab in Seattle Tencent
gaming Just got an Xbox one tried all the microphones I own this was the only thing that worked. Xbox
news H-1B Visa Effect: Infosys To Hire 10,000 American Workers - NDTV Infosys
science Increasing the percentage of elementary school children in the United States who participate in 25 minutes of physical activity three times a week from 32 percent to 50 percent would avoid $21.9 billion in medical costs and lost wages over the course of their lifetimes, new research suggests. United
Documentaries MSNBC's Controlled Opposition: Myth of the Progressive Media2016-Examines MSNBC's Role As A "liberal" Arm of the Corporate Media Progressive
food HOMEMADE Apple Pie Apple
funny Out-of-sync Facebook video grabs Facebook
news GM, Ford and Toyota all post U.S. sales declines in April Toyota
news GM, Ford and Toyota all post U.S. sales declines in April Ford
television "Put down the book, pick up the remote" Collider TV Talk is going live and daily for this week. One of my favourite Youtube shows discussing all things television. Youtube
videos Introducing Microsoft Surface Laptop Microsoft
explainlikeimfive ELI5: Why is the United Airlines CEO testifying before the US Congress? United
Showerthoughts With nearly $250 billion in cash, Apple can now credibly buy an entire country. Apple
worldnews Jordan Edwards shooting: Texas police change account of death - BBC News BBC
videos Revised Toyota Hilux now handles the moose test Toyota
funny This is the second time my local news station has posted something on Facebook without first reading it.... the comments section is blowing up! Facebook
personalfinance Reallocate Target Date Fund? Target
Showerthoughts Even if the Google ad on top of the search result is exactly what I'm looking for, I'll still instinctively click on the same page that isn't displayed as an ad. Google
AskReddit Why do does the Google store say 17+ but when you download a dating app, you have to be 18? Google
videos Neil deGrasse Tyson Gives Audience a Science Boner. Tyson
explainlikeimfive ELI5: Why do people hack others Facebook profiles and start a new one? Facebook
nottheonion Indian IT firm Infosys to hire 10,000 American workers Infosys
pics This is the second time my local news station has posted something on Facebook without first reading it.... the comments section is blowing up! Facebook
pics The new Fanta logo and bottle design in the UK Fanta
funny This Microsoft Support agent came on a little strong Microsoft
news Jordan Edwards shooting: Texas police change account of death - BBC News BBC
todayilearned TIL the United States national bird, the bald eagle, was saved from threat of extinction by the actions of the EPA and a Chippewa National Forest Wildlife biologist. United
news Brexit: Theresa May says she'll be 'bloody difficult' to Juncker - BBC News BBC
AskReddit You've been hired to produce a job posting for President of the United States of America. What does your post say? United
askscience How do forward swept wings on an aircraft differ from a Delta wing and a straight wing? Delta
mildlyinteresting This charging station at my local Audi dealership. Audi
Music Enrique Iglesias - Be With You Dance Pop Acoustic Walmart Soundcheck Walmart
videos Introducing Microsoft Surface Laptop Microsoft
Showerthoughts I haven't actually seen any Apple wireless earbuds in use Apple
mildlyinteresting This sponsored result for Ford when searching for Chevy Ford
funny [Protesters throw Pepsi cans at police during May Day demonstrations World news](https://www.reddit.com/funny/comments/68ubsprotesters_throw_pepsi_cans_at_police_during_may/)
news [Protesters throw Pepsi cans at police during May Day demonstrations World news](https://www.reddit.com/news/comments/68ubup/protesters_throw_pepsi_cans_at_police_during_may/)
Showerthoughts Searching Google on Bing is like a girl asking a friendzoned guy to help her find a boyfriend Google
Music Cameron Grey - Cocaine Ferrari hip-hop 2017 - This kid quietly dropped his album with major production including a track by Kanye Still Trappin and no one knows yet Ferrari
Jokes TIL that Subway will give you your money back if they mess up your order. Subway
videos Venus Ferrari - Beautiful Disaster Electro pop 2017 Ferrari
videos Just a Porsche towing a 314-ton jumbo jet. Porsche
Music Venus Ferrari - Beautiful Disaster Electro pop 2017 Ferrari
pics Saw a Ferrari today. Reminded me of someone... Ferrari
funny Saw a Ferrari today. Reminded me of someone! Ferrari
listentothis Kardashev -- Between Sea and Sky Atmospheric Deathcore / Ambient Sky
Showerthoughts Thank you Google maps for keeping up with my every move then updating me with a creepy "everywhere you were" notification on my phone. Said no one, ever. Google
AskReddit Which is Most Popular Team? Manchester United or Manchester City? United
todayilearned TIL that in the 90's, Coca-Cola tested vending machines that would automatically change prices based on the temperature outside. The higher the temperature the higher the price. Coca-Cola
videos Check out my Friends new Youtube Channel! Youtube
worldnews FBI woman went to Syria to wed IS recruiter she investigated - BBC News BBC
AskReddit Serious Why does the United States think it alone has a god given right to possess nuclear weapons? United
space Cassini Just Dove Into way-too-quiet ‘The Big Empty’ Between Saturn and Its Rings Dove
funny My Mom went from POS to Ferrari in one day. Go Mom!!! Ferrari
news Facebook denies targeting insecure users - BBC News BBC
television How ESPN Became A Conservative Cause ESPN
videos How I Do $250,000 a Month Selling Alibaba and Ali Express Products on eBay & Amazon Alibaba
videos How I Do $250,000 a Month Selling Alibaba and Ali Express Products on eBay & Amazon eBay
worldnews Hackers used Microsoft Word bug 'for months' Microsoft
aww Sai Mama Caterpillar - Sai MaMa Caterpillar says: "Teaching a Child not to squish a bug..." "...Does More for the Child than for the Bug" Caterpillar
worldnews FBI Director Comey, NSA Director Rogers will testify about Russia on Thursday Rogers
worldnews The United States on Tuesday criticized Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's intent to create a new super-body known as a "constituent assembly," saying it was an attempt to cling to power United
videos New and Improved Pepsi Ad featuring Kendall Jenner - Purposely Shitty Version Pepsi
pics An old deck of United Airlines cards from my gf's grandparent's Cribbage set. United
gaming An Xbox Pro Tip from me: Easily mark which games in your collection are backwards compatible by using small green color coding stickers. Xbox
AskReddit Who do you want to be the 46th President of the United States of America and why? United
mildlyinteresting Found a vintage Nike jacket at Goodwill with ticket stubs to Forrest Gump in the pocket Nike
pics Simulated tilt-shift of the new Apple campus. Apple
funny I guess Uber has a new payment method. Uber
worldnews 50,000 Haitians living in the United States could face deportation United
Showerthoughts Uber ratings shouldn't be affected by being drunk in the car. One of the main reasons I Uber is so I don't drive under the influence, so why should that make it harder for me to request a ride in the future? Uber
funny Oh Facebook marketplace, you never cease to amaze me. Facebook
mildlyinteresting This steak that looks exactly like the the contiguous United States United
funny When Taco Bell asks if you got your drink yet and you didn't even order one...just go with the flo Bell
mildlyinteresting Found this 56 year old Pepsi bottle today with the cap on. Pepsi
mildlyinteresting This Nike outlet offers try on socks Nike
todayilearned TIL the founders of The North Face and Patagonia drove from San Francisco to South America on a bus to surf when they were young, and remained friends until death. The North Face
AskReddit Where are porn films made in the United States? United
todayilearned TIL that BBC reported the World Trade Center tower 7 collapsed 20 minutes before the building actually fell. BBC
submitted by HailCorporateRobot to PotentialHailCorp [link] [comments]

Reddit (stylized as reddit, /ˈrɛdɪt/)[5] is a social news aggregation, web content rating, and discussion website. Reddit's registered community members can submit content, such as text posts or direct links.

Registered users can then vote submissions up or down to organize the posts and determine their position on the site's pages. The submissions with the most positive votes appear on the front page or the top of a category. Content entries are organized by areas of interest called "subreddits". The subreddit topics include news, science, gaming, movies, music, books, fitness, food, and image-sharing, among many others. The site's terms of use prohibit behaviors such as harassment, and moderating and limiting harassment has taken substantial resources.[6]
As of 2016, Reddit had 542 million monthly visitors (234 million unique users), ranking #11 most visited web-site in US and #25 in the world.[7] Across 2015, Reddit saw 82.54 billion pageviews, 73.15 million submissions, 725.85 million comments, and 6.89 billion upvotes from its users.[8]
Reddit was founded by University of Virginia roommates Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian in 2005. Condé Nast Publications acquired the site in October 2006. Reddit became a direct subsidiary of Condé Nast's parent company, Advance Publications, in September 2011. As of August 2012, Reddit operates as an independent entity, although Advance is still its largest shareholder.[9] Reddit is based in San Francisco, California. In October 2014, Reddit raised $50 million in a funding round led by Sam Altman and including investors Marc Andreessen, Peter Thiel, Ron Conway, Snoop Dogg, and Jared Leto.[10] Their investment saw the company valued at $500 million.[11][12]
Contents
1 Description 1.1 Site 1.2 Users 1.3 Subreddits 1.3.1 IAmA and AMA 1.3.2 /science 1.3.3 April Fools subreddits 1.3.3.1 The Button 1.3.3.2 Robin 2 History 3 Technology 4 Demographics 5 Community and culture 5.1 Philanthropic efforts 5.2 Commercial activity 5.3 Reddit effect 5.4 "Restoring Truthiness" campaign 5.5 Controversies 5.5.1 2010 5.5.2 2011 5.5.3 2013 5.5.4 2014 5.5.5 2015 5.5.6 2016 6 Other 7 See also 8 References 9 External links 
Description Site
The site is a collection of entries submitted by its registered users, essentially a bulletin board system. The name "Reddit" is a play-on-words with the phrase "read it", i.e., "I read it on Reddit."[13] The site's content is divided into numerous categories, and 49 such categories, or "default subreddits", are visible on the front page to new users and those who browse the site without logging in to an account. As of May 2016, these include:[14] Category Subreddits Educational News, Science, Space, DataIsBeautiful, TodayILearned, WorldNews Entertainment Creepy, Documentaries, Gaming, ListenToThis, Movies, Music, NoSleep, Sports, Television, Videos Discussion-based AskReddit, AskScience, Books, ExplainLikeImFive, History, IAmA, TwoXChromosomes Humolight-hearted Funny, InternetIsBeautiful, Jokes, NotTheOnion, ShowerThoughts, TIFU, UpliftingNews Image sharing Art, Aww, EarthPorn, Gifs, MildlyInteresting, OldSchoolCool, PhotoshopBattles, Pics Self-improvement DIY, Food, GetMotivated, LifeProTips, PersonalFinance, Philosophy, WritingPrompts Technology Futurology, Gadgets Meta Announcements, Blog
Note: There are over 11,400 active subreddits[15][16][17] with a default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. 
When items (links or text posts) are submitted to a subreddit, the users, called "redditors",[18] can vote for or against them (upvote/downvote). Each subreddit has a front page that shows newer submissions that have been rated highly. Redditors can also post comments about the submission, and respond back and forth in a conversation-tree of comments; the comments themselves can also be upvoted and downvoted. The front page of the site itself shows a combination of the highest-rated posts out of all the subreddits a user is subscribed to.
Front-page rank – for both the general front page and for individual subreddits – is determined by the age of the submission, positive ("upvoted") to negative ("downvoted") feedback ratio and the total vote-count.[19] Dozens of submissions cycle through these front pages daily.
The site's logo and mascot is a line drawing of an alien nicknamed "Snoo". Subreddits often use themed variants of Snoo relevant to the subject.[20]
Although most of the site functions like a bulletin board or message board, each subreddit has the option of having an associated wiki that can provide supplementary material like instructions, recommended reading, or collaboration for real-life events. Users
Registering an account with Reddit is free and does not require an email address to complete. As of June 2015, there were 36 million user accounts.[21] When logged in, Reddit users (known as redditors) have the ability to vote on submissions and comments to increase or decrease their visibility and submit links and comments. Users can also create their own subreddit on a topic of their choosing, and interested users can add it to their frontpage by subscribing to it. For example, as of May 2015, the Wikipedia subreddit – subtitled "the most interesting pages on Wikipedia" – has over 151,000 subscribers.[22] Reddit comments and submissions are occasionally abbreviated and peppered with terms that are understood within (and in many cases also outside) the Reddit community, ranging from OP (for "original poster" – the user who posted the submission being commented upon) to NSFW (for "not safe for work" – indicating the post has graphic or sexually explicit content).[23] Users earn "post karma" and "comment karma" for submitting text posts, link posts, and comments, which accumulate as point values on their user profile. "Post karma" refers to karma points received from text and link posts, while "comment karma" refers to karma points received from comments. Users may also be gifted "Reddit gold" if another user has well received the comment or post, generally due to humorous or high quality content; this process is known as "gilding." Reddit has also created a system of points called "creddits". Reddit gold "creddits" are like gift certificates: each creddit you have allows you to give one month of Reddit gold to someone else. The points do not lead to a prize as they are meant to stand in as a badge of honor for the user among their peers, although redditors have attempted to redeem their points before.[24]
Reddit also allows submissions that do not link externally. These are called "self posts" or "text submissions". Many discussion-based subreddits allow only text-only submissions such as "AskReddit" – where users are only allowed to pose broad, discussion based questions to the community at large. Self posts previously did not accumulate karma points for the submitter, but as of July, 2016, these text only posts generate karma.[25] Mister Splashy Pants logo used on November 27, 2007
Reddit communities occasionally coordinate Reddit-external projects such as skewing polls on other websites, such as in 2007 when Greenpeace allowed web users to decide the name of a humpback whale it was tracking. Reddit users voted en masse to name the whale "Mr. Splashy Pants", and Reddit administrators further encouraged this by changing the site logo to a whale during the voting. In December of that year, Mister Splashy Pants was announced as the winner of the competition.[26]
Within the site, redditors commemorate their "cake day" once a year, which is the anniversary of the day the user's account was first created. The "cake day" offers no special benefit, except that a small icon representing a slice of cake appears next to that user's name for 24 hours.[27] Redditors can "friend" one another, which gives a redditor quick access to posting and comments of their friend list. The commenting system and friend system, along with a certain "Reddit ethos" (called reddiquette on Reddit), lend Reddit aspects of a social networking service, though not to the extent of Facebook, Google+, and other websites aimed at providing social networking services. The Reddit community also socializes at meetups held at local parks and bars around the world,[28] and many localized subreddits for local in-person meetings exist. Subreddits
Reddit entries are organized into areas of interest called "subreddits". Originally, the front page was the "main-reddit", and other areas were "subreddits". There is now no longer a single main-reddit. Instead, there are now 50 "default subreddits" dealing with topics such as books, television, and music, and thousands of additional non-default subreddits. The default subreddits are the 50 subreddits which are first recommended to new users to select from to appear on, or via their customizable top menu bars. All new users are initially automatically "subscribed to" the 50 default subreddits, but can then customize their "subscriptions."
Any registered user who has maintained an account for 31 days or more may create a non-default subreddit.[29] There are over 11,400 active total subreddits to peruse,[15][16][17] including the default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. The site has a default "Front Page" which contains staff selected popular articles, and also an "All Page" which contains only the very top ranked article/ subreddits as ranked by readers themselves, and which page is accessible via an "All" link at the top of the "Front Page."
In an interview with Memeburn, Reddit GM, Martin noted that the platform's "approach is to give the community moderators or curators as much control as possible so that they can shape and cultivate the type of communities they want".[30] IAmA and AMA
One of the most popular subreddits is IAmA ("I Am A") where a user may post "AMAs" (for "Ask Me Anything"), or similarly "AMAAs" (for "Ask Me Almost/Absolutely Anything") – prompts for others to ask questions about any topic. AMAs are open to all Reddit users, and use the site's comment system for both questions and answers; it is similar to a press conference but online. This subreddit was founded in May 2009.[31] From 2013 to 2015, Victoria Taylor assisted reddit's volunteer community in presenting interviews.[32][33][34]
A number of notable individuals have participated in the IAmA subreddit, including United States President Barack Obama[35][36] (while campaigning for the 2012 election), Dave Grohl,[37] Madonna,[38] Chris Hadfield[39] (who answered questions from the International Space Station), Bill Gates,[40] Ron Paul,[41] Stephen Colbert,[42] Psy, Enya, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Rachel Maddow, Renée Fleming, M. Shadows, Louis C.K., Roger Federer, Larry King, Philip Zimbardo, Bill Nye,[43] Stan Lee, John Mather, David Copperfield, Paul Krugman, Danny Boyle, rapper J. Cole,[44] Al Gore, Roger Ebert, Michael Bolton, Gary Johnson, Lawrence Krauss, Jill Stein, Kevin Rudd, Julie Benz,[45] Amanda Palmer,[46] Tim Ferriss,[47] Gordon Ramsay,[48] Peter Dinklage,[49] Chandra Wickramasinghe,[50] Neil deGrasse Tyson,[51] and Bernie Sanders.[52] Donald Trump (during his 2016 Presidential Campaign) had an AMA on /The Donald subreddit.[53] As of April 2015, Barack Obama's AMA is the highest rated on the site;[54] the increased traffic brought down many parts of the website when the AMA occurred on August 29, 2012.[55]
Celebrities participating in IAmAs have seen both positive and negative responses. Woody Harrelson's[56] AMA was criticized after Harrelson declined to answer questions that were unrelated to the movie Rampart he was promoting.[57] In contrast, rapper Snoop Dogg attracted 1.6 million page views[58] after conducting an AMA that provided several candid responses to the community's questions.[59]
Other than Harrelson's, Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra's[60] AMA was criticized for evasiveness when she focused on promoting her upcoming album to the detriment of other questions. A particularly well received AMA of 2014 was that of Peter Dinklage,[61] best known for his role as Tyrion Lannister in the HBO drama series Game of Thrones. Redditors attribute the thread's success to the thoroughness of his responses and the fact that he stayed online much longer than he was expected to so he could spend more time with his fans. The actor departed by commenting:
This feels like being interviewed by a hundred thousand news anchors at once! But much friendlier anchors...who seem to know their material...I really appreciate everyone's enthusiasm and questions. I tried to move another engagement to make more time but it's really hard during shoots. I am going to try to answer a few more short ones now. And remember: If you see me on the street and want a photo, ask! It's just weird when your kid asks for directions.[62] 
On July 2, 2015, hundreds of subreddits, including several with over a million subscribers, were set to private by their respective moderators after Reddit's director of talent, Victoria Taylor, was dismissed.[63][64][65][66] Sources close to Reddit cited an increased focus on commercializing AMAs as the most likely reason.[67][68] /science File:American Chemical Society - What Chemists Do - Nathan Allen.webmPlay media Nathan Allen speaks about /science to the American Chemical Society Main article: /science
/science is an Internet forum on Reddit where the community of participants discuss science topics.[69] A popular feature of the forum is "Ask me Anything" (AMA) public discussions.[69] As of 2014, /science attracted 30,000-100,000 visitors per day, making it the largest community-managed science forum and an attractive place to host discussions.[69] April Fools subreddits The Button Main article: The Button (Reddit)
On April Fools' Day 2015, a social experiment was launched in the form of a subreddit called "thebutton". It featured a button and a 60-second countdown timer. User accounts created before that day were eligible to participate. A user could only ever click the button once, or opt not to click it. If a user clicked the button the timer was globally reset to 60 seconds,[70] and the user's "flair" (an icon next to the user's name) changed color. Colors were assigned based on a gradient from purple to red with purple signifying up to 60 seconds and red as low as 0 seconds. The countdown prematurely reached zero several times due to technical problems but eventually expired without further problems on June 5, 2015, after which the subreddit was archived.[71] Robin
On April Fools' Day 2016, a social experiment was launched in the form of a chat widget named Robin. After clicking the "Robin" button, an IRC-like chat window was initially opened with one other redditor and giving a certain time to pick between three options, "Grow," "Stay" and "Abandon".[72] "Grow" would join the chat with another group, "Stay" would close the group chat and create a subreddit with that group as moderators and "Abandon" would close the group chat and everyone goes back to a group of two. History Further information: Timeline of Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian speaking in 2009
In June 2005,[73] Reddit was founded in Medford, Massachusetts by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian, both 22-year-old graduates of the University of Virginia.[74] The team expanded to include Christopher Slowe in November 2005. Between November 2005 and January 2006 Reddit merged with Aaron Swartz's company Infogami, and Swartz became an equal owner of the resulting parent company, Not A Bug.[75][76] Condé Nast Publications, owner of Wired, acquired Reddit on October 31, 2006, and the team moved to San Francisco.[77] In January 2007, Swartz was fired.[78]
By the end of 2008, the team had grown to include Erik Martin, Jeremy Edberg,[79] David King,[80] and Mike Schiraldi.[81] In 2009, Huffman and Ohanian moved on to form Hipmunk, recruiting Slowe[82] and King[83] shortly thereafter. In May 2010, Reddit was named in Lead411's "2010 Hottest San Francisco Companies" list.[84] In July 2010, after explosive traffic growth, Reddit introduced Reddit Gold, offering new features for a price of $3.99/month or $29.99/year.[85] Reddit Gold adds a number of features to the interface, including the ability to display more comments on a page, access to the private "lounge" subreddit, and notifications whenever one's username is mentioned in a comment. It's also possible to endow comments or submissions of other users and thereby give a gold membership to them as an anonymous present.[86]
On September 6, 2011, Reddit became operationally independent of Condé Nast, now operating as a separate subsidiary of its parent company, Advance Publications.[87] On January 11, 2012, Reddit announced that it would be participating in a 12-hour sitewide blackout in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act.[88] The blackout occurred on January 18 and coincided with the blackouts of Wikipedia and several other websites. In May 2012, Reddit joined the Internet Defense League, a group formed to organize future protests.[89] On February 14, 2013, Reddit began accepting the digital currency bitcoin for its Reddit Gold subscription service through a partnership with bitcoin payment processor Coinbase.[90]
In October 2014, Reddit announced Redditmade, a service which allowed moderators to create merchandise for their subreddits. Redditmade closed in February 2015.[91] In November 2014, Chief Executive Yishan Wong resigned and co-founder Ohanian returned as the full-time executive chairman. Ellen Pao, Reddit's business and partnerships strategist became the interim chief executive.[92] On July 10, 2015, Pao resigned and was replaced by Steve Huffman as CEO.[93][94]
In October 2015, Reddit announced a news portal called Upvoted, designed to broaden the reach of Reddit as a standalone site featuring editorial content from Reddit users.[95] In April 2016, Reddit launched a new blocking tool in an attempt to curb online harassment. The tool allows a user to hide posts and comments from selected redditors in addition to blocking private messages from those redditors.[96] The option to block a redditor is done by clicking a button in the inbox. Technology
Reddit was originally written in Common Lisp but was rewritten in Python in December 2005.[4] The reasons given for the switch were wider access to code libraries and greater development flexibility. The Python web framework that former Reddit employee Swartz developed to run the site, web.py, is now available as an open-source project.[97] On June 18, 2008, Reddit became an open source project.[98] With the exception of the anti-spam/cheating portions, all of the code and libraries written for Reddit became freely available on GitHub.[99] As of November 10, 2009, Reddit uses Pylons as its web framework.[100]
As of November 10, 2009, Reddit has decommissioned their physical servers and migrated to Amazon Web Services.[101] Reddit uses PostgreSQL as their primary datastore and is slowly moving to Apache Cassandra, a column-oriented datastore. It uses RabbitMQ for offline processing, HAProxy for load balancing and memcached for caching. In early 2009, Reddit started using jQuery.[102] On June 7, 2010, Reddit staff launched a revamped mobile interface featuring rewritten CSS, a new color scheme, and a multitude of improvements.[103]
On July 21, 2010, Reddit outsourced the Reddit search engine to Flaptor, who used its search product IndexTank.[104] As of July 12, 2012, Reddit uses Amazon CloudSearch.[105] There are several unofficial applications that use the Reddit API in the Google Play store, and F-Droid repository. Examples include: Reddit is Fun,[106] Andreddit,[107] F5, BaconReader,[108] Reddit Sync[109] and an Android tablet specific application called Reddita.[110] There are also several Windows apps used to access Reddit, including unofficial Reddit apps such as ReddHub[111] and Reddit To Go!.[112] An unofficial desktop application Reditr[113] exists that is compatible with Windows, OS X, Linux and ChromeOS.
There are several Reddit applications for iOS. These include Karma, Upvote, iReddit, iPad-specific applications such as Reddzine and Biscuit, and, until April 2016, Alien Blue.[114] In September 2014, an official mobile application for browsing AMA (Ask Me Anything) threads was released for the iOS and Android platforms under the name Ask me Anything.[115] In October 2014, Alien Blue was acquired by Reddit and became the official iOS Reddit app.[116] In April 2016, Reddit released an official application called Reddit: The Official App, which is available on Google Play and the iOS App Store, and Alien Blue was removed from the App Store in favor of the new app.[117] Demographics
According to Reddit's Audience and Demographics page, as of December 2015, 53% of redditors are male and 54% are from the United States.[118] In 2013 Pewinternet.org stated that 6% of all American adult Internet users have used Reddit; that males were twice as likely to be redditors as females were; and that Reddit's largest age bracket was between the ages of 18 and 29.[119] Community and culture
The website is known for its open nature and diverse user community that generate its content.[120] Its demographics allows for wide-ranging subject areas, or main subreddits, that receive much attention, as well as the ability for smaller subreddits to serve more niche purposes. For example, the University of Reddit, a subreddit that exists to communally teach, emerged from the ability to enter and leave the online forum, the "classroom", at will, and classes ranging from computer science to music, to fine art theory exist.[121] The unique possibilities that subreddits provide create new opportunities for raising attention and fostering discussion across many areas. In gaining popularity in terms of unique users per day, Reddit has been a platform for many to raise publicity for a number of causes. And with that increased ability to garner attention and a large audience, users can use one of the largest communities on the Internet for new, revolutionary, and influential purposes.[122]
Its popularity has enabled users to take unprecedented advantage of such a large community. Its innovative socially ranked rating and sorting system drives a method that is useful for fulfilling certain goals of viewership or simply finding answers to interesting questions. User sentiments about the website's function and structure include feelings about the breadth and depth of the discussions on Reddit and how the site makes it easy to discover new and interesting items. Almost all of the user reviews on Alexa.com, which rates Reddit's monthly unique traffic rating 125th in the United States, mention Reddit's "good content" as a likable quality. However, others raise the negative aspects of the potential for Reddit's communities to possess a "hive mind" of sorts,[123] embodying some negative aspects of group interaction theories like crowd psychology and collective consciousness. Philanthropic efforts
Reddit has been known as the instigator of several charity projects, some short and others long-term, in order to benefit others. A selection of major events are outlined below:
In early October 2010, a story was posted on Reddit about a seven-year-old girl, Kathleen Edward, who was in the advanced stages of Huntington's disease. The girl's neighbors were taunting her and her family. Redditors banded together and gave the girl a shopping spree[124][125] at Tree Town Toys, a toy store local to the story owned by a Reddit user. In early December 2010, members of the Christianity subreddit decided to hold a fundraiser[126] and later members of the atheism subreddit decided to give some friendly competition,[127] cross-promoting[128] fundraising drives for Doctors Without Borders and World Vision's Clean Water Fund, respectively. Later, the Islam subreddit joined in, raising money for Islamic Relief. In less than a week, the three communities (as well as the Reddit community at large) raised over $50,000.[129] Most of this was raised by the atheism subreddit, though the smaller Christianity subreddit had a higher average donation amount per subscriber.[130] A similar donation drive in 2011 saw the atheism subreddit raise over $200,000 for charity.[131] Reddit started the largest Secret Santa program in the world, which is still in operation to date. For the 2010 Holiday season, 92 countries were involved in the Secret Santa program. There were 17,543 participants, and $662,907.60 was collectively spent on gift purchases and shipping costs.[132][133][134] In 2014, about 200,000 users from 188 countries participated.[135] Several Celebrities have participated in the program, including Bill Gates[136] and Snoop Dogg.[137] Eventually, the Secret Santa program expanded to various other occasions through Redditgifts. Members from Reddit donated over $600,000 to DonorsChoose in support of Stephen Colbert's March to Keep Fear Alive. The donation spree broke previous records for the most money donated to a single cause by the Reddit community and resulted in an interview with Colbert on Reddit.[138] Reddit users donated $185,356 to Direct Relief for Haiti after an earthquake devastated the nation in January 2010.[139] Reddit users donated over $70,000 to the Faraja Orphanage in the first 24 hours to help secure the orphanage after intruders robbed and attacked one of the volunteers, who survived a strike to the head from a machete.[140] In October 2012, "Shitty Watercolour", a popular Redditor known for posting watercolor paintings on the website,[141][142][143] streamed live a 12-hour painting session on YouTube to raise money for charity: water, a non-profit organization which aims to provide potable drinking water in developing countries. Redditors donated a minimum of $10 to have a photo of their choice painted in a 5 by 5 centimetres (2.0 by 2.0 in) square section of large sheets of paper.[144][145] The paint-a-thon raised $2,700.[146] In February 2014, Reddit announced it would be donating 10% of its annual ad revenue to non-profits voted upon by its users.[147] Reddit continued this policy for 2015, donating $82,765 each to Electronic Frontier Foundation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Doctors Without Borders, Erowid Center, Wikimedia Foundation, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, NPR, Free Software Foundation, Freedom From Religion Foundation, and Tor Project.[148] In response to the 2015 Nepal Earthquake, redditors raised more than $145,000 for Direct Relief and more than $110,000 for MAP International.[149] 
Commercial activity
In February 2013, Betabeat published a post that recognized the influx of multi-national corporations like Costco, Taco Bell, Subaru, and McDonald's posting branded content on Reddit that was made to appear as if it was original content from legitimate Reddit users.[150] Reddit's former Director of Communications noted that while a large number of Chief Marketing Officers want to "infiltrate the reddit community on behalf of their brand," she emphasized that "self-promotion is frowned upon" and the site is "100 percent organic."[151][152][153][154] She recommended that advertisers design promotions that "spark conversations and feedback."[155] She recommended that businesses use AMAs to get attention for public figures but cautioned "It is important to approach AMAs carefully and be aware that this may not be a fit for every project or client."[156] Nissan ran a successful Branded content promotion offering users free gifts to publicize a new car,[157][158] though the company was later ridiculed for suspected astroturfing when the CEO only answered puff piece questions on the site.[159][160] Taylor described these situations as "high risk" noting "We try hard to educate people that they have to treat questions that may seem irreverent or out of left field the same as they would questions about the specific project they are promoting."[161]
Reddit's users are more privacy-conscious than on other websites, using tools like AdBlock and proxies,[162] and they hate "feeling manipulated by brands" but respond well to "content that begs for intelligent viewers and participants."[163] Lauren Orsini writes in ReadWrite that "Reddit's huge community is the perfect hype machine for promoting a new movie, a product release, or a lagging political campaign" but "very specific set of etiquette. Redditors don't want to advertise for you, they want to talk to you."[164] Journalists have used the site as a basis for stories, though they are advised by the site's policies to respect that "reddit's communities belong to their members" and to seek proper attribution for people's contributions.[165]
Reddit announced that they would begin using VigLink to redirect affiliate links in June 2016.[166] Reddit effect Main article: Slashdot effect
Also known as the "Slashdot effect", the Reddit effect occurs when a smaller website has a high influx of traffic after being linked to on Reddit.[167] It is also called the "Reddit Hug of Death" among the website's users. Because Reddit is such a large site, the traffic is immense and can easily crash smaller sites. In order for users to see crashed websites, several Reddit bots have been created that take a snapshot of the website before large amounts of traffic flood the affected website. "Restoring Truthiness" campaign
As a response to Glenn Beck's August 28, 2010, Restoring Honor rally (heavily promoted by him in his Fox News broadcasts during the summer), in September 2010 Reddit users started a movement to persuade Stephen Colbert to have a counter-rally in Washington, D.C.[168] The movement, which came to be called "Restoring Truthiness", was started by user mrsammercer, in a post where he described waking up from a dream in which Stephen Colbert was holding a satirical rally in D.C.[169] He writes, "This would be the high water mark of American satire. Half a million people pretending to suspend all rational thought in unison. Perfect harmony. It'll feel like San Francisco in the late 60s, only we won't be able to get any acid."
The idea resonated with the Reddit community, which launched a campaign to bring the event to life. Over $600,000[170] was raised for charity to gain the attention of Colbert. The campaign was mentioned on-air several times, and when the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear was held in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 2010, thousands of redditors made the journey.[171]
During a post-rally press conference, Reddit co-founder Ohanian asked, "What role did the Internet campaign play in convincing you to hold this rally?" Jon Stewart responded by saying that, though it was a very nice gesture, the two had already thought of the idea prior and the deposit on using the National Mall was already paid during the summer, so it acted mostly as a "validation of what we were thinking about attempting".[172] In a message to the Reddit community, Colbert later added, "I have no doubt that your efforts to organize and the joy you clearly brought to your part of the story contributed greatly to the turnout and success."[173]
See also
General
Crowdsourcing Internet culture PTT Bulletin Board System Social bookmarking Unidan Web 2.0 iconInternet portal 
Similar websites
Delicious Digg Diigo Fark Imzy Kuro5hin MetaFilter StumbleUpon Voat 
submitted by NERDSLAYER_Y2K to Negareddit [link] [comments]

Second.

Reddit (stylized as reddit, /ˈrɛdɪt/)[5] is an American social news aggregation, web content rating, and discussion website. Reddit's registered community members can submit content, such as text posts or direct links. Registered users can then vote submissions up or down to organize the posts and determine their position on the site's pages. The submissions with the most positive votes appear on the front page or the top of a category. Content entries are organized by areas of interest called "subreddits". The subreddit topics include news, science, gaming, movies, music, books, fitness, food, and image-sharing, among many others. The site's terms of use prohibit behaviors such as harassment, and moderating and limiting harassment has taken substantial resources.[6]
As of 2017, Reddit had 542 million monthly visitors (234 million unique users), ranking #7 most visited web-site in US and #22 in the world.[7] Across 2015, Reddit saw 82.54 billion pageviews, 73.15 million submissions, 725.85 million comments, and 6.89 billion upvotes from its users.[8]
Reddit was founded by University of Virginia roommates Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian in 2005. Condé Nast Publications acquired the site in October 2006. Reddit became a direct subsidiary of Condé Nast's parent company, Advance Publications, in September 2011. As of August 2012, Reddit operates as an independent entity, although Advance is still its largest shareholder.[9] Reddit is based in San Francisco, California. In October 2014, Reddit raised $50 million in a funding round led by Sam Altman and including investors Marc Andreessen, Peter Thiel, Ron Conway, Snoop Dogg, and Jared Leto.[10] Their investment saw the company valued at $500 million.[11][12]
Contents
1 Description 1.1 Site 1.2 Users 1.3 Subreddits 1.3.1 IAmA and AMA 1.3.2 /science 1.3.3 April Fools subreddits 1.3.3.1 The Button 1.3.3.2 Robin 2 History 3 Technology 4 Demographics 5 Community and culture 5.1 Philanthropic efforts 5.2 Commercial activity 5.3 Reddit effect 5.4 "Restoring Truthiness" campaign 5.5 Controversies 5.5.1 2010 5.5.2 2011 5.5.3 2013 5.5.4 2014 5.5.5 2015 5.5.6 2016 5.5.7 2017 6 Other 7 See also 8 References 9 External links 
Description Site
The site is a collection of entries submitted by its registered users, essentially a bulletin board system. The name "Reddit" is a play-on-words with the phrase "read it", i.e., "I read it on Reddit."[13] The site's content is divided into numerous categories, and 49 such categories, or "default subreddits", are visible on the front page to new users and those who browse the site without logging in to an account. As of May 2016, these include:[14] Category Subreddits Educational News, Science, Space, DataIsBeautiful, TodayILearned, WorldNews Entertainment Creepy, Documentaries, Gaming, ListenToThis, Movies, Music, NoSleep, Sports, Television, Videos Discussion-based AskReddit, AskScience, Books, ExplainLikeImFive, History, IAmA, TwoXChromosomes Humolight-hearted Funny, InternetIsBeautiful, Jokes, NotTheOnion, ShowerThoughts, TIFU, UpliftingNews Image sharing Art, Aww, EarthPorn, Gifs, MildlyInteresting, OldSchoolCool, PhotoshopBattles, Pics Self-improvement DIY, Food, GetMotivated, LifeProTips, PersonalFinance, Philosophy, WritingPrompts Technology Futurology, Gadgets Meta Announcements, Blog
Note: There are over 11,400 active subreddits[15][16][17] with a default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. 
When items (links or text posts) are submitted to a subreddit, the users, called "redditors",[18] can vote for or against them (upvote/downvote). Each subreddit has a front page that shows newer submissions that have been rated highly. Redditors can also post comments about the submission, and respond back and forth in a conversation-tree of comments; the comments themselves can also be upvoted and downvoted. The front page of the site itself shows a combination of the highest-rated posts out of all the subreddits a user is subscribed to.
Front-page rank – for both the general front page and for individual subreddits – is determined by the age of the submission, positive ("upvoted") to negative ("downvoted") feedback ratio and the total vote-count.[19] Dozens of submissions cycle through these front pages daily.
The site's logo and its mascot is a line drawing of an alien nicknamed "Snoo". Subreddits often use themed variants of Snoo relevant to the subject.[20]
Although most of the site functions like a bulletin board or message board, each subreddit has the option of having an associated wiki that can provide supplementary material like instructions, recommended reading, or collaboration for real-life events. Users
Registering an account with Reddit is free and does not require an email address to complete. As of June 2015, there were 36 million user accounts.[21] When logged in, Reddit users (known as redditors) have the ability to vote on submissions and comments to increase or decrease their visibility and submit links and comments. Users can also create their own subreddit on a topic of their choosing, and interested users can add it to their frontpage by subscribing to it. For example, as of May 2015, the Wikipedia subreddit – subtitled "the most interesting pages on Wikipedia" – has over 151,000 subscribers.[22] Reddit comments and submissions are occasionally abbreviated and peppered with terms that are understood within (and in many cases also outside) the Reddit community, ranging from OP (for "original poster" – the user who posted the submission being commented upon) to NSFW (for "not safe for work" – indicating the post has graphic or sexually explicit content).[23] Users earn "post karma" and "comment karma" for submitting text posts, link posts, and comments, which accumulate as point values on their user profile. "Post karma" refers to karma points received from text and link posts, while "comment karma" refers to karma points received from comments. Users may also be gifted "Reddit gold" if another user has well received the comment or post, generally due to humorous or high-quality content; this process is known as "gilding." Reddit has also created a system of points called "creddits". Reddit gold "creddits" are like gift certificates: each creddit you have allows you to give one month of Reddit gold to someone else. The points do not lead to a prize as they are meant to stand in as a badge of honor for the user among their peers, although redditors have attempted to redeem their points before.[24]
Reddit also allows submissions that do not link externally. These are called "self posts" or "text submissions". Many discussion-based subreddits allow only text-only submissions such as "AskReddit" – where users are only allowed to pose broad, discussion based questions to the community at large. Self posts previously did not accumulate karma points for the submitter, but as of July, 2016, these text-only posts generate karma.[25] Mister Splashy Pants logo used on November 27, 2007
Reddit communities occasionally coordinate Reddit-external projects such as skewing polls on other websites, such as in 2007 when Greenpeace allowed web users to decide the name of a humpback whale it was tracking. Reddit users voted en masse to name the whale "Mr. Splashy Pants", and Reddit administrators further encouraged this by changing the site logo to a whale during the voting. In December of that year, Mister Splashy Pants was announced as the winner of the competition.[26]
Within the site, redditors commemorate their "cake day" once a year, which is the anniversary of the day the user's account was first created. The "cake day" offers no special benefit, except that a small icon representing a slice of cake appears next to that user's name for 24 hours.[27] Redditors can "friend" one another, which gives a redditor quick access to posting and comments of their friend list. The commenting system and friend system, along with a certain "Reddit ethos" (called reddiquette on Reddit), lend Reddit aspects of a social networking service, though not to the extent of Facebook, Google+, and other websites aimed at providing social networking services. The Reddit community also socializes at meetups held at local parks and bars around the world,[28] and many localized subreddits for local in-person meetings exist. Subreddits
Reddit entries are organized into areas of interest called "subreddits". Originally, the front page was the "main-reddit", and other areas were "subreddits". There is now no longer a single main-reddit. Instead, there are now 50 "default subreddits" dealing with topics such as books, television, and music, and thousands of additional non-default subreddits. The default subreddits are the 50 subreddits which are first recommended to new users to select from to appear on, or via their customizable top menu bars. All new users are initially automatically "subscribed to" the 50 default subreddits, but can then customize their "subscriptions."
Any registered user who has maintained an account for 31 days or more may create a non-default subreddit.[29] There are over 11,400 active total subreddits to peruse,[15][16][17] including the default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. The site has a default "Front Page" which contains staff selected popular articles, and also an "All Page" which contains only the very top ranked article/ subreddits as ranked by readers themselves, and which page is accessible via an "All" link at the top of the "Front Page."
In an interview with Memeburn, Reddit GM, Martin noted that the platform's "approach is to give the community moderators or curators as much control as possible so that they can shape and cultivate the type of communities they want".[30] IAmA and AMA
One of the most popular subreddits is IAmA ("I Am A") where a user may post "AMAs" (for "Ask Me Anything"), or similarly "AMAAs" (for "Ask Me Almost/Absolutely Anything") – prompts for others to ask questions about any topic. AMAs are open to all Reddit users, and use the site's comment system for both questions and answers; it is similar to a press conference but online. This subreddit was founded in May 2009.[31] From 2013 to 2015, Victoria Taylor assisted reddit's volunteer community in presenting interviews.[32][33][34]
A number of notable individuals have participated in the IAmA subreddit, including United States President Barack Obama[35][36] (while campaigning for the 2012 election), Dave Grohl,[37] Madonna,[38] Chris Hadfield[39] (who answered questions from the International Space Station), Bill Gates,[40] Ron Paul,[41] Stephen Colbert,[42] Psy, Enya, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Rachel Maddow, Robin Williams,[43] Renée Fleming, M. Shadows, Louis C.K., Roger Federer, Larry King, Philip Zimbardo, Bill Nye,[44] Stan Lee, John Mather, David Copperfield, Michael Moore, Spike Lee, Paul Krugman, Danny Boyle, rapper J. Cole,[45] Al Gore, Roger Ebert, Michael Bolton, Gary Johnson, Lawrence Krauss, Jill Stein, Kevin Rudd, Julie Benz,[46] Amanda Palmer,[47] Tim Ferriss,[48] Gordon Ramsay,[49] Peter Dinklage,[50] Chandra Wickramasinghe,[51] Neil deGrasse Tyson,[52] and Bernie Sanders.[53] Donald Trump (during his 2016 Presidential Campaign) had an AMA on /The Donald subreddit.[54] As of April 2015, Barack Obama's AMA is the highest rated on the site;[55] the increased traffic brought down many parts of the website when the AMA occurred on August 29, 2012.[56]
Celebrities participating in IAmAs have seen both positive and negative responses. Woody Harrelson's[57] AMA was criticized after Harrelson declined to answer questions that were unrelated to the movie Rampart he was promoting.[58] In contrast, rapper Snoop Dogg attracted 1.6 million page views[59] after conducting an AMA that provided several candid responses to the community's questions.[60]
Other than Harrelson's, Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra's[61] AMA was criticized for evasiveness when she focused on promoting her upcoming album to the detriment of other questions. A particularly well received AMA of 2014 was that of Peter Dinklage,[62] best known for his role as Tyrion Lannister in the HBO drama series Game of Thrones. Redditors attribute the thread's success to the thoroughness of his responses and the fact that he stayed online much longer than he was expected to so he could spend more time with his fans. The actor departed by commenting:
This feels like being interviewed by a hundred thousand news anchors at once! But much friendlier anchors...who seem to know their material...I really appreciate everyone's enthusiasm and questions. I tried to move another engagement to make more time but it's really hard during shoots. I am going to try to answer a few more short ones now. And remember: If you see me on the street and want a photo, ask! It's just weird when your kid asks for directions.[63] 
On July 2, 2015, hundreds of subreddits, including several with over a million subscribers, were set to private by their respective moderators after Reddit's director of talent, Victoria Taylor, was dismissed.[64][65][66][67] Sources close to Reddit cited an increased focus on commercializing AMAs as the most likely reason.[68][69] /science File:American Chemical Society - What Chemists Do - Nathan Allen.webmPlay media Nathan Allen speaks about /science to the American Chemical Society Main article: /science
/science is an Internet forum on Reddit where the community of participants discuss science topics.[70] A popular feature of the forum is "Ask me Anything" (AMA) public discussions.[70] As of 2014, /science attracted 30,000–100,000 visitors per day, making it the largest community-managed science forum and an attractive place to host discussions.[70] April Fools subreddits The Button Main article: The Button (Reddit)
On April Fools' Day 2015, a social experiment was launched in the form of a subreddit called "thebutton". It featured a button and a 60-second countdown timer. User accounts created before that day were eligible to participate. A user could only ever click the button once, or opt not to click it. If a user clicked the button the timer was globally reset to 60 seconds,[71] and the user's "flair" (an icon next to the user's name) changed color. Colors were assigned based on a gradient from purple to red with purple signifying up to 60 seconds and red as low as 0 seconds. The countdown prematurely reached zero several times due to technical problems but eventually expired without further problems on June 5, 2015, after which the subreddit was archived.[72] Robin
On April Fools' Day 2016, a social experiment was launched in the form of a chat widget named Robin. After clicking the "Robin" button, an IRC-like chat window was initially opened with one other redditor and giving a certain time to pick between three options, "Grow," "Stay" and "Abandon".[73] "Grow" would join the chat with another group, "Stay" would close the group chat and create a subreddit with that group as moderators and "Abandon" would close the group chat and everyone goes back to a group of two. History Further information: Timeline of Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian speaking in 2009
In June 2005,[74] Reddit was founded in Medford, Massachusetts by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian, both 22-year-old graduates of the University of Virginia.[75] The team expanded to include Christopher Slowe in November 2005. Between November 2005 and January 2006 Reddit merged with Aaron Swartz's company Infogami, and Swartz became an equal owner of the resulting parent company, Not A Bug.[76][77] Condé Nast Publications, owner of Wired, acquired Reddit on October 31, 2006, and the team moved to San Francisco.[78] In January 2007, Swartz was fired.[79]
By the end of 2008, the team had grown to include Erik Martin, Jeremy Edberg,[80] David King,[81] and Mike Schiraldi.[82] In 2009, Huffman and Ohanian moved on to form Hipmunk, recruiting Slowe[83] and King[84] shortly thereafter. In May 2010, Reddit was named in Lead411's "2010 Hottest San Francisco Companies" list.[85] In July 2010, after explosive traffic growth, Reddit introduced Reddit Gold, offering new features for a price of $3.99/month or $29.99/year.[86] Reddit Gold adds a number of features to the interface, including the ability to display more comments on a page, access to the private "lounge" subreddit, and notifications whenever one's username is mentioned in a comment. It's also possible to endow comments or submissions of other users and thereby give a gold membership to them as an anonymous present.[87]
On September 6, 2011, Reddit became operationally independent of Condé Nast, now operating as a separate subsidiary of its parent company, Advance Publications.[88] On January 11, 2012, Reddit announced that it would be participating in a 12-hour sitewide blackout in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act.[89] The blackout occurred on January 18 and coincided with the blackouts of Wikipedia and several other websites. In May 2012, Reddit joined the Internet Defense League, a group formed to organize future protests.[90] On February 14, 2013, Reddit began accepting the digital currency bitcoin for its Reddit Gold subscription service through a partnership with bitcoin payment processor Coinbase.[91]
In October 2014, Reddit announced Redditmade, a service which allowed moderators to create merchandise for their subreddits. Redditmade closed in February 2015.[92] In November 2014, Chief Executive Yishan Wong resigned and co-founder Ohanian returned as the full-time executive chairman. Ellen Pao, Reddit's business and partnerships strategist became the interim chief executive.[93] On July 10, 2015, Pao resigned and was replaced by Steve Huffman as CEO.[94][95]
In October 2015, Reddit announced a news portal called Upvoted, designed to broaden the reach of Reddit as a standalone site featuring editorial content from Reddit users.[96] In April 2016, Reddit launched a new blocking tool in an attempt to curb online harassment. The tool allows a user to hide posts and comments from selected redditors in addition to blocking private messages from those redditors.[97] The option to block a redditor is done by clicking a button in the inbox. Technology
Reddit was originally written in Common Lisp but was rewritten in Python in December 2005.[4] The reasons given for the switch were wider access to code libraries and greater development flexibility. The Python web framework that former Reddit employee Swartz developed to run the site, web.py, is now available as an open-source project.[98] On June 18, 2008, Reddit became an open source project.[99] With the exception of the anti-spam/cheating portions, all of the code and libraries written for Reddit became freely available on GitHub.[100] As of November 10, 2009, Reddit uses Pylons as its web framework.[101]
As of November 10, 2009, Reddit has decommissioned their physical servers and migrated to Amazon Web Services.[102] Reddit uses PostgreSQL as their primary datastore and is slowly moving to Apache Cassandra, a column-oriented datastore. It uses RabbitMQ for offline processing, HAProxy for load balancing and memcached for caching. In early 2009, Reddit started using jQuery.[103] On June 7, 2010, Reddit staff launched a revamped mobile interface featuring rewritten CSS, a new color scheme, and a multitude of improvements.[104]
On July 21, 2010, Reddit outsourced the Reddit search engine to Flaptor, who used its search product IndexTank.[105] As of July 12, 2012, Reddit uses Amazon CloudSearch.[106] There are several unofficial applications that use the Reddit API in the Google Play store, and F-Droid repository. Examples include: Reddit is Fun,[107] Andreddit,[108] F5, BaconReader,[109] Reddit Sync[110] and an Android tablet specific application called Reddita.[111] There are also several Windows apps used to access Reddit, including unofficial Reddit apps such as ReddHub[112] and Reddit To Go!.[113] An unofficial desktop application Reditr[114] exists that is compatible with Windows, OS X, Linux and ChromeOS.
There are several Reddit applications for iOS. These include Karma, Upvote, iReddit, iPad-specific applications such as Reddzine and Biscuit, and, until April 2016, Alien Blue.[115] In September 2014, an official mobile application for browsing AMA (Ask Me Anything) threads was released for the iOS and Android platforms under the name Ask me Anything.[116] In October 2014, Alien Blue was acquired by Reddit and became the official iOS Reddit app.[117] In April 2016, Reddit released an official application called Reddit: The Official App, which is available on Google Play and the iOS App Store, and Alien Blue was removed from the App Store in favor of the new app.[118] Demographics
According to Reddit's Audience and Demographics page, as of December 2015, 53% of redditors are male and 54% are from the United States.[119] In 2013, Pewinternet stated that 6% of all American adult Internet users have used Reddit; that males were twice as likely to be redditors as females were; and that Reddit's largest age bracket was between the ages of 18 and 29.[120] As of the end of 2016, Reddit is the only major social media platform that does not have a female majority user base.[121] Community and culture
The website is known for its open nature and diverse user community that generate its content.[122] Its demographics allows for wide-ranging subject areas, or main subreddits, that receive much attention, as well as the ability for smaller subreddits to serve more niche purposes. For example, the University of Reddit, a subreddit that exists to communally teach, emerged from the ability to enter and leave the online forum, the "classroom", at will, and classes ranging from computer science to music, to fine art theory exist.[123] The unique possibilities that subreddits provide create new opportunities for raising attention and fostering discussion across many areas. In gaining popularity in terms of unique users per day, Reddit has been a platform for many to raise publicity for a number of causes. And with that increased ability to garner attention and a large audience, users can use one of the largest communities on the Internet for new, revolutionary, and influential purposes.[124]
Its popularity has enabled users to take unprecedented advantage of such a large community. Its innovative socially ranked rating and sorting system drives a method that is useful for fulfilling certain goals of viewership or simply finding answers to interesting questions. User sentiments about the website's function and structure include feelings about the breadth and depth of the discussions on Reddit and how the site makes it easy to discover new and interesting items. Almost all of the user reviews on Alexa.com, which rates Reddit's monthly unique traffic rating 125th in the United States, mention Reddit's "good content" as a likable quality. However, others raise the negative aspects of the potential for Reddit's communities to possess a "hive mind" of sorts,[125] embodying some negative aspects of group interaction theories like crowd psychology and collective consciousness. Philanthropic efforts
Reddit has been known as the instigator of several charity projects, some short and others long-term, in order to benefit others. A selection of major events are outlined below:
In early October 2010, a story was posted on Reddit about a seven-year-old girl, Kathleen Edward, who was in the advanced stages of Huntington's disease. The girl's neighbors were taunting her and her family. Redditors banded together and gave the girl a shopping spree[126][127] at Tree Town Toys, a toy store local to the story owned by a Reddit user. In early December 2010, members of the Christianity subreddit decided to hold a fundraiser[128] and later members of the atheism subreddit decided to give some friendly competition,[129] cross-promoting[130] fundraising drives for Doctors Without Borders and World Vision's Clean Water Fund, respectively. Later, the Islam subreddit joined in, raising money for Islamic Relief. In less than a week, the three communities (as well as the Reddit community at large) raised over $50,000.[131] Most of this was raised by the atheism subreddit, though the smaller Christianity subreddit had a higher average donation amount per subscriber.[132] A similar donation drive in 2011 saw the atheism subreddit raise over $200,000 for charity.[133] Reddit started the largest Secret Santa program in the world, which is still in operation to date. For the 2010 Holiday season, 92 countries were involved in the Secret Santa program. There were 17,543 participants, and $662,907.60 was collectively spent on gift purchases and shipping costs.[134][135][136] In 2014, about 200,000 users from 188 countries participated.[137] Several celebrities have participated in the program, including Bill Gates[138] and Snoop Dogg.[139] Eventually, the Secret Santa program expanded to various other occasions through Redditgifts. Members from Reddit donated over $600,000 to DonorsChoose in support of Stephen Colbert's March to Keep Fear Alive. The donation spree broke previous records for the most money donated to a single cause by the Reddit community and resulted in an interview with Colbert on Reddit.[140] Reddit users donated $185,356 to Direct Relief for Haiti after an earthquake devastated the nation in January 2010.[141] Reddit users donated over $70,000 to the Faraja Orphanage in the first 24 hours to help secure the orphanage after intruders robbed and attacked one of the volunteers, who survived a strike to the head from a machete.[142] In October 2012, "Shitty Watercolour", a popular Redditor known for posting watercolor paintings on the website,[143][144][145] streamed live a 12-hour painting session on YouTube to raise money for charity: water, a non-profit organization which aims to provide potable drinking water in developing countries. Redditors donated a minimum of $10 to have a photo of their choice painted in a 5 by 5 centimetres (2.0 by 2.0 in) square section of large sheets of paper.[146][147] The paint-a-thon raised $2,700.[148] In February 2014, Reddit announced it would be donating 10% of its annual ad revenue to non-profits voted upon by its users.[149] Reddit continued this policy for 2015, donating $82,765 each to Electronic Frontier Foundation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Doctors Without Borders, Erowid Center, Wikimedia Foundation, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, NPR, Free Software Foundation, Freedom From Religion Foundation, and Tor Project.[150] In response to the 2015 Nepal earthquake, redditors raised more than $145,000 for Direct Relief and more than $110,000 for MAP International.[151] 
Commercial activity
In February 2013, Betabeat published a post that recognized the influx of multi-national corporations like Costco, Taco Bell, Subaru, and McDonald's posting branded content on Reddit that was made to appear as if it was original content from legitimate Reddit users.[152] Reddit's former Director of Communications noted that while a large number of Chief Marketing Officers want to "infiltrate the reddit community on behalf of their brand," she emphasized that "self-promotion is frowned upon" and the site is "100 percent organic."[153][154][155][156] She recommended that advertisers design promotions that "spark conversations and feedback."[157] She recommended that businesses use AMAs to get attention for public figures but cautioned "It is important to approach AMAs carefully and be aware that this may not be a fit for every project or client."[158] Nissan ran a successful Branded content promotion offering users free gifts to publicize a new car,[159][160] though the company was later ridiculed for suspected astroturfing when the CEO only answered puff piece questions on the site.[161][162] Taylor described these situations as "high risk" noting "We try hard to educate people that they have to treat questions that may seem irreverent or out of left field the same as they would questions about the specific project they are promoting."[163]
Reddit's users are more privacy-conscious than on other websites, using tools like AdBlock and proxies,[164] and they hate "feeling manipulated by brands" but respond well to "content that begs for intelligent viewers and participants."[165] Lauren Orsini writes in ReadWrite that "Reddit's huge community is the perfect hype machine for promoting a new movie, a product release, or a lagging political campaign" but "very specific set of etiquette. Redditors don't want to advertise for you, they want to talk to you."[166] Journalists have used the site as a basis for stories, though they are advised by the site's policies to respect that "reddit's communities belong to their members" and to seek proper attribution for people's contributions.[167]
Reddit announced that they would begin using VigLink to redirect affiliate links in June 2016.[168] Reddit effect Main article: Slashdot effect
Also known as the "Slashdot effect", the Reddit effect occurs when a smaller website has a high influx of traffic after being linked to on Reddit.[169] It is also called the "Reddit Hug of Death" among the website's users. Because Reddit is such a large site, the traffic is immense and can easily crash smaller sites. In order for users to see crashed websites, several Reddit bots have been created that take a snapshot of the website before large amounts of traffic flood the affected website. "Restoring Truthiness" campaign
As a response to Glenn Beck's August 28, 2010, Restoring Honor rally (heavily promoted by him in his Fox News broadcasts during the summer), in September 2010 Reddit users started a movement to persuade satirist Stephen Colbert to have a counter-rally in Washington, D.C.[170] The movement, which came to be called "Restoring Truthiness", was started by user mrsammercer, in a post where he described waking up from a dream in which Stephen Colbert was holding a satirical rally in D.C.[171] He writes, "This would be the high water mark of American satire. Half a million people pretending to suspend all rational thought in unison. Perfect harmony. It'll feel like San Francisco in the late 60s, only we won't be able to get any acid."
The idea resonated with the Reddit community, which launched a campaign to bring the event to life. Over $600,000[172] was raised for charity to gain the attention of Colbert. The campaign was mentioned on-air several times, and when the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear was held in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 2010, thousands of redditors made the journey.[173]
During a post-rally press conference, Reddit co-founder Ohanian asked, "What role did the Internet campaign play in convincing you to hold this rally?" Jon Stewart responded by saying that, though it was a very nice gesture, the two had already thought of the idea prior and the deposit on using the National Mall was already paid during the summer, so it acted mostly as a "validation of what we were thinking about attempting".[174] In a message to the Reddit community, Colbert later added, "I have no doubt that your efforts to organize and the joy you clearly brought to your part of the story contributed greatly to the turnout and success."[175] Controversies See also: Controversial Reddit communities and Michael Brutsch
The website generally lets moderators on individual subreddits make editorial decisions about what content to allow, and has a history of permitting some subreddits dedicated to controversial content.[176] Many of the default pages are highly moderated, with the "science" subreddit banning climate change denialism,[177] and the "news" subreddit banning opinion pieces and columns.[178] Reddit has changed its site-wide editorial policies several times, sometimes in reaction to controversies.[179][180][181][182] Reddit has had a history of giving a platform to objectionable but legal content, and in 2011, news media covered the way that jailbait was being shared on the site before the site changed their policies to explicitly ban "suggestive or sexual content featuring minors".[183] Following some controversial incidents of Internet vigilantism, Reddit introduced a strict rule against the publication of non-public personally-identifying information via the site (colloquially known as doxxing). Those who break the rule are subject to a site-wide ban, and their posts and even entire communities may be removed for breaking the rule. 2010
On December 16, 2010, a redditor named Matt posted a link describing how he has donated a kidney, and included a JustGive link to encourage users to give donations to the American Cancer Society.[184] After an initially positive reaction, Reddit users began to become suspicious of Matt's intentions, and suggested that he was keeping the donations for himself. Users telephoned his home and he received death threats. Matt eventually proved that he was genuine by uploading his doctor's records.[185] 2011
On October 18, 2011, an IT manager submitted a post to the subreddit "gameswap" offering Redditors to trade one of 312 codes he had been given for the game Deus Ex: Human Revolution.[186] A group of users obtained his personal details, and began to blackmail him for the codes.[187] The Monday after uploading the post, he received 138 threatening phone calls both at home and at his job, and by the end of the day he had been fired.[188] 2013
Following the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, Reddit faced criticism after users wrongly identified a number of people as suspects.[189] Notable among misidentified bombing suspects was Sunil Tripathi, a student reported missing before the bombings took place. A body reported to be Sunil's was found in Providence River in Rhode Island on April 25, 2013, according to Rhode Island Health Department. The cause of death was not immediately known, but authorities said they did not suspect foul play.[190] The family later confirmed Tripathi's death was a result of suicide.[191] Reddit general manager Martin later issued an apology for this behavior, criticizing the "online witch hunts and dangerous speculation" that took place on the website.[192] The incident was later referenced in the season 5 episode of the CBS TV series The Good Wife titled "Whack-a-Mole,"[193] as well as The Newsroom.[194][195]
In late October 2013, the moderators of the "politics" subreddit banned a large group of websites. Many were left wing opinion websites, such as Mother Jones, The Huffington Post, Salon, Alternet, Rawstory, The Daily Kos, Truthout, Media Matters, and ThinkProgress as well as some popular progressive blog sites, such as Democratic Underground and Crooks and Liars. They also banned a number of right wing sites—Drudge Report, Breitbart, The Daily Caller, Dailypaul, Power Line, and Reason. Salon reported that "the section's moderators explained in a post on Tuesday, the goal is 'to reduce the number of blogspam submissions and sensationalist titles.' The purge, the moderators explained, is also aimed at sites that provide lots of "bad journalism."[196] The December 2013 list of banned websites has been modified since late October, and sites with original content, such as Mother Jones and The Huffington Post, are allowed.[197] Moderators also banned RT, which moderators stated was due to vote manipulation and spam, though one moderator stated that he wanted RT banned because it is Kremlin backed.[198][199] 2014
In August 2014, photos from the 2014 celebrity photo hack were widely disseminated across the site.[200][201] A dedicated subreddit, "TheFappening," was created for this purpose,[202] and contained links to most if not all of the criminally obtained explicit images.[203][204][205][206][207] Some images of Liz Lee and McKayla Maroney from the leak were identified by redditors and outside commentators as child pornography because the photos were taken when the women were underage.[208] The subreddit was banned on September 6.[209] The scandal led to wider criticisms concerning the website's administration from The Verge and The Daily Dot.[210][211]
Also in August 2014, moderators and administrators censored a sizeable amount of content related to the GamerGate controversy; one thread in the "gaming" subreddit had almost 24,000 comments removed.[212] Multiple subreddits were deleted by administrators for voicing opinions on Zoe Quinn, Anita Sarkeesian, Brianna Wu and similarly important GamerGate controversy figures.[213] The subreddit "ZoeQuinnDiscussion" was banned for violating the Reddit rules.[214] Administrators defended this response when questioned, blaming 4chan for raiding threads and causing harm. This was debated by some redditors.[215] An anonymous subreddit moderator claims he was removed for leaking correspondence between himself and Zoe Quinn.[216] On December 18, 2014, Reddit took the unusual step of banning a subreddit, "SonyGOP," that was being used to distribute hacked Sony files.[217] 2015
After Ellen Pao became CEO, she was initially a target of criticism by users who objected to her lawsuit.[218] Later on June 10, 2015, Reddit shut down the 150,000-subscriber "fatpeoplehate" subreddit and four others citing issues related to harassment.[219] This move was seen as very controversial; some commenters said that the bans went too far, while others said that the bans did not go far enough.[220] One of the latter complaints concerned a subreddit that was "expressing support" for the perpetrator of the Charleston church shooting.[221] Responding to the accusations of "skewed enforcement", Reddit reaffirmed their commitment to free expression and stated that "There are some subreddits with very little viewership that get highlighted repeatedly for their content, but those are a tiny fraction of the content on the site."
On July 2, 2015, Reddit began experiencing a series of blackouts as moderators set popular subreddit communities to private, in an event dubbed "AMAgeddon," a portmanteau of AMA ("ask me anything") and Armageddon. This was done in protest of the recent firing of Victoria Taylor, an administrator who helped organize citizen-led interviews with famous people on the popular "Ask me Anything" subreddit. Organizers of the blackout also expressed resentment about the recent severance of the communication between Reddit and the moderators of subreddits.[222] The blackout intensified on July 3 when former community manager David Croach gave an AMA about being fired. Before deleting his posts, he stated that Ellen Pao dismissed him with one year of health coverage when he had cancer and did not recover quickly enough.[223][224] Following this, a Change.org petition to remove Pao as CEO of Reddit Inc. reached over 200,000 signatures.[225][226][227] Pao posted a response on July 3 as well as an extended version of it on July 6 in which she apologized for bad communication and not delivering on promises. She also apologized on behalf of the other administrators and noted that problems already existed over the past several years.[228][229][230][231] On July 10, Pao resigned as CEO and was replaced by former CEO and co-founder Steve Huffman.[94][232]
submitted by ViabilityTest to test [link] [comments]

Can we organize an Ethereum charity stream? (long post)

Hey guys! Long time cryptocurrency holder here. I got into Ethereum in the original crowd-sale after a few years dabbling in bitcoin land.
This is probably going to be long, but it would be really cool if you could read through it and tell me what you think :)
Inception
The origination of this idea came from a documentary I did that featured Reddit. As some of you may recall, Reddit broke some records donating to DonorsChoose.org in order to get the attention of Stephen Colbert. This was spawned when one user wrote this post.
From there someone had the idea to try and donate $100,000 to DonorsChoose in 30 days. After 24 hours, $100,000 had already been donated. In all, over a half of a million dollars was raised to fund school programs all over the United States.
This was an amazing event, and got the attention of a ton of people. It was a really great feel-good event.
So that's where this idea came from.
Purpose
Let's face it, the average person has no idea what Ethereum is. I would argue most people have never even heard of Bitcoin (although it is certainly growing in popularity). Bitcoin has been demonized over and over as a money-laundering tool, a terrorism currency, and more. Anyone involved in the community knows that these are non-sense arguments, but there's a decent number of people that believe that to be the case.
Ethereum has no reputation though. Even all the press about the DAO didn't reach that many people who weren't already interested.
This could be a really brilliant opportunity to show off the basics of Ethereum to the average person. Yes... I understand that this is not showing the true potential of Ethereum. But it's an easy way to get the name out there with a positive connotation to the average person. I think a stream would be an amazing opportunity to hit a great market of young people.
The effect of a big event like this could be really cool. I think Ethereum has a great opportunity to change the world for the better!
Streaming
I would be willing, if the community agrees, to run the stream. I won several awards for broadcasting in college for sports, I've been a commentator for world-class Starcraft 2 players, and I even became Reddit's resident expert on How to Eat a Burrito. Not really, but it was fun to be on the front page for a bit :)
The contents of the stream would be largely determined by the event. There's plenty of things we could do, but it is hugely dependent on the backing the event gets. I would definitely lean on the community for ideas though. I would be willing to do some crazy 24-hour stream or something if it was for a good cause :)
Sponsorship
This is a pretty tricky topic. I'm hoping that people can trust me that I'm not a shill or backed by anyone on this. I've been a Redditor for over 6 and a half years, so I'm hoping that gives me a little bit of credibility and believably on this.
With the disclaimer out of the way, it seems like Coinbase would be a natural fit for a type of sponsorship. They're set up in the US (and internationally), and just added Ethereum to their site. Obviously their sponsorship would come with logos and whatnot on the stream. However, I think having a corporate sponsor would allow the event to be bigger and more fun. Their sponsorship could provide giveaways and whatnot that would help people tune in. In addition, it would ensure that there's accountability for the donations. I don't think people would trust sending it to a random address, so having the backing of Coinbase could really help.
This isn't a definitive thing, and if the community wanted to sponsor it instead (to promote /Ethereum), I would be 100% open to that idea. I think it would be cool to do something like that, but, sadly, I don't think people are going to jump at the chance to throw money into something that may not even happen.
Charity to Donate to
This, again, would be put to the community to figure out the most fitting charity. I know plenty that I could throw in, but I would love for this to be as community-driven as possible.
Expectations
Honestly, this is entirely a pipe dream, but I couldn't let the day go by without posting it. If you read this far, thanks! I know Reddit is typically full of cynics ready to tell me all the ways that this doesn't work, but I still like being optimistic when I can :)
submitted by HeIsMyPossum to ethereum [link] [comments]

$260,000 per Bitcoin Stephen Colbert Introduces BTC to Millions  Ethereum 2.0 Specs  Crypto News www.youtube.com May 2nd: Larry Wilmore, Bitcoin and Ringling Elephants Reddit Founder Talking Crypto On Stephen Colbert Show BREAKING: MAINSTREAM MEDIA PUMPING BITCOIN [Stephen Colbert, CNBC, C-SPAN]

Bitcoin goes mainstream since on Thursday night Stephen Colbert, the popular TV night show host mentioned the leading cryptocurrency in his monologue as we are about to read further in the bitcoin news below.. As normal, the TV host and entertainer weighed in on bitcoin and made fun of the state of US politics addressing the serious matter with slight humor on the situation. Averaging 3.81 million viewers, Stephen Colbert, who inked a new deal through 2023, tops the late show ratings, outperforming The Tonight Show‘s 2.44 million and Jimmy Kimmel Live!‘s 2.04 million. In November, Colbert characterized Bitcoin – known for its cryptography, complexity, and volatility – as a blockchain-based snoozefest. Stephen Colbert, host of The Late Show, makes jokes about Donald Trump's presidential campaign rallies and inserts a light-hearted skit about chatting with someone who knows alot about bitcoin and loves to talk more about blockchain. Bitcoin was on the Friday night episode of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, where he brought up the leading cryptocurrency, thrusting Bitcoin into the brain of millions in a different way. Bitcoin equivalent of the $4.7 trillion US debt that was signed into federal law by President Trump would put the price of a single BTC at $260,000. Stephen Colbert has taken jabs at Twitter and Jack Dorsey over the recent Bitcoin scam hack. "Fun fact: 'We all feel terrible this happened' is Twitter's official motto." We're using cookies to ...

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$260,000 per Bitcoin Stephen Colbert Introduces BTC to Millions Ethereum 2.0 Specs Crypto News

No matter what he's wearing, Stephen Colbert is getting used to life under quarantine and some of the simple pleasures that come along with it, like washing ... Reddit CEO Talks Bitcoin On The Late Show With Stephen Colbert - Duration: 7:58. Trillinair 2,522 views. 7:58. Justin Sun And Gang Take Over Steemit - Duration: 26:57. Watch Bitcoin Mentioned on Stephen Colbert's LATE NIGHT, CNBC, and C-SPAN. Like. Comment. Subscribe. Follow us on Twitter (WATCH FULL STEPHEN CLIP): video, sharing, camera phone, video phone, free, upload Welcome to the official YouTube channel for "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert"! Weeknights at 11:35pm/10:35c

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